Speaker:
Professor Harry Lewis
Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science,
School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University

Date: 30 October 2012 (Tue)
Time: 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Venue: LG-06, Hui Oi Chow Science Building

Registration

Abstract
Professor Harry Lewis will report on an experiment teaching in a “flipped classroom”, in which students watched lectures over the Internet in their dormitory rooms, and spent class time solving problems. The subject matter was discrete mathematics, which is well suited to this pedagogical style, but the class was so successful that he expects it will be widely adapted at Harvard—if a variety of serious practical problems can be managed.

About the Speaker
Professor Harry Lewis is Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University. He served as Dean of Harvard College from 1995-2003. He holds A.B., A.M., and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard, all in Applied Mathematics.

Throughout his career, Professor Lewis has been actively involved in pedagogical innovation. He is the author of numerous books and articles in three areas of scholarship: theoretical computer science; the social implications of the development of the Internet; and the history and future of higher education. His recent books include Excellence Without a Soul: Does Liberal Education Have a Future?; Blown to Bits: Your Life, Liberty, and Happiness After the Digital Explosion; and What Is College For? The Public Purpose of Higher Education.

All are welcome. For enquiries, please mail to commoncore@hku.hk or call 2219 4957.