Teaching and Learning at The University of Hong Kong HKU

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Organised by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Details of the workshop:

Date : 28 November , 2017 (Tuesday)
Time : 12:45pm – 2:00pm
Venue : Room 321, 3/F, Run Run Shaw Building (Main Campus), HKU
Facilitator : Dr. Cecilia Chan, Head of Professional Development, Associate Professor, HKU
Career Building: Developing Your Teaching Ideas, Insight and Action Workshop Series
Workshop I: Teaching Development GRANT (TDG) – the Outcomes, Activities, Limitations, Evidence and Budget

 

Abstract

This is part of a workshop series to help both new and experienced teachers to realise the resources available in the university, their recognition and potential in teaching, ultimately, to build their career in higher education. The “Career Building: Developing Your Teaching Ideas, Insight and Action Series” will include workshops to develop your teaching portfolio for fellowship and Teaching Excellence Awards, career planning (particularly if you are on a teaching track), research into scholarship in teaching and learning including Teaching Development Grant, chit and chatting, mix and matching on challenges, ideas and actions, as well as sharing from other teachers who have been engaging in best teaching practices.

The first workshop will be on how to write a teaching development grant, given the final round of 2017 is on Friday, 29 December, many teachers may be wondering if they should apply, and if they are qualified to apply, and what can they apply for, what kind of limitation, outcomes and initiatives are expected in a TDG, all the what and how of TDGs will be answered. I sincerely encourage you to come along if you are thinking of applying for a TDG.

Registration

For information, please contact:
Ms. Noranda Zhang , CETL
Phone: 3917 4729; Email: noranda@hku.hk​

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By the courtesy of the Teaching Innovation Unit at the Centre for Teaching and Learning Development of the National Taiwan University (NTU), TELI participated in a professional development programme entitled “eProfessor” that was held on April 29-30, 2017 – the Labour Day long weekend. We have heard about the magic of this bootcamp from Professor Benson Yeh (former Director of the MOOC Project in NTU) for a couple of years – but seeing is believing.

Success factors of NTU’s e-learning professional development programmes

  • Blended with a Facebook closed group for pre-event communication and community building
  • Intensive face-to-face sessions focusing on participatory learning
  • Genuine sharing of successful and failing experiences by both invited speakers and participants
  • Real-time support from organizing team: from video production to instructional design – prompt follow-up on the spot

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Some 30 teachers showed up at the training. Before the face-to-face programme began, they were asked to prepare a Facebook post with a short smartphone-quality clip telling their fellow bootcamp members two things about themselves: one that is true, one that is false. The purpose is twofold: to get some experience about video-taking, and to break the ice in the group. As Rick Levin said, watching yourself on a screen could be horrifying for first-timers – so this pre-event assignment seemed to be a good warm-up exercise for everybody.
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The highly participatory bootcamp features hands-on exercises, group work with peer-feedback, workshops and experience sharing. The topics included:

  • Flipped classroom and peer-to-peer learning
  • Practical lessons from pioneers of flipped classroom teaching and learning
  • Instructional design for problem-based learning
  • Pedagogical skills in an e-learning environment
  • Tools to facilitate the visualization of teaching and learning materials (e.g., DIY video making software)

The intensive face-to-face sessions might look demanding, but they equipped members with the necessary skills and supporting network to jumpstart a forward change in technology-enriched pedagogical practices. In his sharing of flipping a civil engineering course, Professor Huang Yin-nan said it is important to have partners in an e-learning journey. Collaboration and interaction facilitate reflective practice, and provides an emotional safety net when teachers are in doubts and encounter frustrations. “We share both successful and failing experiences. In fact, very often we learn more from the latter,” he told the participants.

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(Source: http://ntumoocs.blogspot.hk/)

Throughout the “eProfessor” initiative, challenges are matched by support. The 10-people strong Teaching Innovation Unit at the Centre for Teaching and Learning Development provided comprehensive support on-the-spot: from setting up closed groups on Facebook for your course, to getting filming equipment ready for lecture recording. They have also produced excellent tutorials for teachers’ self-learning. Here is a sample on proper lighting for video-taking:
https://youtu.be/V3pevaUNle0

Thank you NTU, we have so much to learn from you!

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Organised by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Details of the workshop:

Date : July 8 (Friday), 2016
Time : 12:30 p.m. – 13:30 p.m.
Venue : Room 321, 3/F, Run Run Shaw Building (Main Campus), HKU
Speakers:

  • Professor Gavin T. L. Brown, Director, Quantitative Data Analysis and Research Unit, Faculty of Education and Social Work, University of Auckland;
  • Dr. Tanja Sobko, Assistant Professor, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Hong Kong.

Facilitator:

  • Dr. Susan Bridges, Associate Professor, CETL, The University of Hong Kong

Sandwiches will be served with coffee and tea.

Abstract

Focusing on what you value: A considered approach to assessing ePortfolios
ePortfolio creation, using any of a number of digital tools, is an opportunity for students to assemble work that shows not only high quality products and performances, but also to show development over time, focus on speciality, and demonstration of breadth. These highly valued characteristics of engaged learning make adoption of eportfolio as a basis for assessment very attractive. In addition, policy pressure encourages academia to keep up with innovations in educational technology related to learning and assessment. Demonstrating entry-level competence in a number of professions (e.g., teaching) is often achieved by assembly of an ePortfolio.

However, enthusiasm for ePortfolios often overlooks the challenges facing the assessment of the completed ePortfolio, especially around both the feasibility and validity of rankings, scores, judgements, and/or feedback. A number of approaches to assessment exist (e.g., checklist completion, quantification of components, rubric-based judgement, and professional intuition). This seminar will emphasise the importance of defining clearly the curricular goals targeted by the ePortfolio and overview the pros and cons of the various approaches. Using insights from psychometrics and recent research into the experience of students in ePortfolio usage, the seminar will help participants work towards defensible practices that lead to valid interpretations and decisions about student learning embodied in an ePortfolio.

ePortfolio in higher education in Hong Kong–Applicability of an ePortfolio, through online reflection/feedback of using wearable technology.
The interactions between human beings and the wearable technology can be linked to learning concepts/instructional methods like knowledge building, situated, self-regulated and active learning. They may also be linked to development of new literacies, such as eHealth. To understand this process in higher education in Hong Kong, a multiple case study including 30 students from an undergraduate course, BSc Exercise and Health has been conducted. Each student used a wearable device (activity tracker) over a period of five months, reflected weekly on emerging personal data, documents their thinking and action in the ePortfolio, and engaged in an online forum. The participants entered their experiences with the biometric data, lifestyle adaptations (e.g. more sleep), special situations (e.g. hike, HR changes during activity) and how these experiences led to specific searches and actions on the web and/or in their real social network. The ePortfolio allowed the students to critically reflect on their progress and for the researchers to intervene at any time on the issues related to the participants’ postings. Evidence regarding change in eHealth at the beginning and end of the intervention were collected with a well-established questionnaire. By documenting the activity tracker in their own ePortfolio, the students continuously learned to search and to critically assess personal and available online information, organize it and present for peers/tutor. This in turn was expected to enhance their critical thinking, raise questions about health related topics, stimulate further inquiry – make the ePortfolio a tool for reflective and autonomous learning.

About the Speakers:

Professor Gavin T. L. Brown, PhD is the Director of the Quantitative Data Analysis and Research Unit in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. After 13 years a teacher, Prof Brown was a standardised test developer for 9 years working on diagnostic educational testing, including the computer-assisted asTTle system. His research focuses on testing, assessing, and measuring student achievement and analysing the human and social factors that help and hinder greater learning outcomes. Gavin is the lead editor of the Routledge Handbook of Human and Social Factors in Assessment (2016) in which insights gleaned from educational psychology and policy research are applied to large-scale testing programs and classroom assessment. Methodologically, Prof Brown has extensive experience with classical test and item response theory, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, and multivariate statistical analysis.
Dr. Tanja Sobko has multidisciplinary expertise in nutrition, healthy lifestyle interventions (PhD, 2006, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden) and recently Physical Activity and Sports Nutrition (HKU). She contributed early-nutrition work for WHO, Programme for Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity. Her recent research focuses on lifestyle modifications for families with pre-schoolers for better health. Dr Sobko is a PI for the projects “Targeting Early Obesity” (Macau), and “Play and Grow” (Hong Kong) – both aim, through exposing the families to nature, to influence daily habits and routines early in life. She teaches courses “Physical Activity and Health”, “Sports Nutrition” and has been engaged in Teaching and Learning Development, focusing on ePortfolio and its applicability in the context of undergraduate education at HKU. When she doesn’t research, she actively practices Aikido and hikes around HK and other exciting countries.

Registration

For information, please contact:
Ms. Noranda Zhang , CETL
Phone: 3917 4729; Email: noranda@hku.hk​

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Organized by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Date : 4 May, 2016 (Wednesday)
Time : 12:45pm – 2:00pm
Venue : Room 321, Run Run Shaw Building

Abstract:

As the world moves towards knowledge-based economies, increased emphasis is being placed on graduates’ acquisition of generic skills competency along their disciplinary knowledge. Most universities have emphasized the skills development in their educational outcomes.

A mixed method study conducted in Hong Kong with a representative sample of over 2500 undergraduate students from three research-intensive universities found that majority of the students believe that generic skills are important and are better developed through activities particularly in extra-curricular and out-of-class activities such as internship, experiential learning, student societies and residential education.

In this workshop, we will introduce a framework for the development of generic skills based on the concept of “avoider” and “engager” on student approaches to learning in oppose to the well-known deep and surface approaches. We will also discuss how these skills can be assessed (if it should be assessed at all) and how can students document these learning outcomes as part of their learning process?

Facilitators

  • Dr. Cecilia Chan, Head of Professional Development, Associate Professor, CETL

About the Speaker:
Dr. Cecilia Chan
Head of Professional Development/Associate Professor

Dr. Cecilia Chan is the Head of Professional Development and an Associate Professor in the Centre of the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning at The University of Hong Kong (HKU). Cecilia has a dual cultural background; she was originally born in Hong Kong but grew up in Ireland. In addition to her dual cultural background, she also has a dual discipline expertise in engineering and education; she has been playing an important role in enhancing engineering, business and science education. Her combined expertise in these fields and multi-cultural experience enabled her to lead and conduct research on topics such as assessment, technology enhanced learning and the development and assessment of 21st century skills from east to west in the different disciplines.
Cecilia holds a PhD in Engineering from Trinity College, a postgraduate diploma and a MA in Higher Education. She also held a Fellowship from King’s College London. She has received many teaching awards and has over 15 years of effective practical experience in engaging students. Cecilia is also the recipient of the HKU outstanding young researcher award 2015/16.

Registration

For information on registration, please contact:
Ms. Noranda Zhang , CETL
Phone: 3917 4729; Email: noranda@hku.hk​

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Organized by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Date : 5 April, 2016 (Tuesday)
Time : 12:45pm – 2:00pm
Venue : Room 321, Run Run Shaw Building

Abstract:

In academic contexts, reflection is an essential tool for both teaching and learning. It refers to the active intellectual monitoring and evaluation of one’s own formal learning and professional practice activities, and this very process that leads to new knowledge and self-understanding. This workshop would focus specifically on the context of reflective learning, and examines how reflection can be an essential part of teaching and learning within higher education. By exploring the possible conceptualization and implementation of reflective learning within the different disciplines, we will discuss and share insights and tools on how to motivate, engage, and assess the learning of students through reflection.

Facilitators

  • Dr. Cecilia Chan, Head of Professional Development, Associate Professor, CETL
  • Dr. Michael Chan, Project Officer, CETL

About the Speaker:
Dr. Cecilia Chan
Head of Professional Development/Associate Professor

Dr. Cecilia Chan is the Head of Professional Development and an Associate Professor in the Centre of the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning at The University of Hong Kong (HKU). Cecilia has a dual cultural background; she was originally born in Hong Kong but grew up in Ireland. In addition to her dual cultural background, she also has a dual discipline expertise in engineering and education; she has been playing an important role in enhancing engineering, business and science education. Her combined expertise in these fields and multi-cultural experience enabled her to lead and conduct research on topics such as assessment, technology enhanced learning and the development and assessment of 21st century skills from east to west in the different disciplines.
Cecilia holds a PhD in Engineering from Trinity College, a postgraduate diploma and a MA in Higher Education. She also held a Fellowship from King’s College London. She has received many teaching awards and has over 15 years of effective practical experience in engaging students.

Dr. Michael CHAN
Project Officer

Dr. Michael Chan received a M.A degree in Cultural and Religious studies and a Ph.D in Religious Studies both from the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2010 and 2015 respectively. As an Adjunct Lecturer for different higher education institutions in Hong Kong, he teaches undergraduate courses on comparative culture and religion, particularly on the development of contemporary religious traditions and its connection with current global issues.
Michael is responsible in managing and executing different research projects on teaching and learning at CETL. Apart from working on the Centre’s latest project on developing and assessing generic skills in engineering education, he is keen to explore avenue of teaching and learning that approximates to his own research interest in culture and religion, particularly on the impact of ethnic diversity and multiculturalism on teaching and learning approaches and experiences.

Registration

For information on registration, please contact:
Ms. Noranda Zhang , CETL
Phone: 3917 4729; Email: noranda@hku.hk​

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Event video

HKU is a committed member of the UN campaign HeForShe. The overall goal of HeForShe is to spread awareness and spark actions on the responsibility that men and boys have in eliminating all forms of discrimination against women. TecHKU and TELI share the same vision. They mobilised a group of HKU students to organise a hands-on workshop “Girls4Tech” for secondary school girls in late February, and received enthusiastic support from our President Professor Peter Mathieson, “I’m particularly keen to see the University hosting this kind of event. This is exactly the kind of thing that the HeForShe campaign envisages. Starting at all ages – the idea of trying to improve gender equality. Technical careers are not just for boys, they’re for everybody.”

“Girls4Tech” aims to nurture computational thinking in secondary school girls and to inspire them on possibilities of developing a career in the tech sector. A detailed report on the event is available here.

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Speech by President Mathieson: Girls4Tech is exactly what HeForShe envisages

On February 27, 2016, more than 120 bright young ladies from 17 local secondary schools gathered at HKU for the student-led event “Girls4Tech” to learn about careers in the tech industry and attempt hands-on coding exercises. Both our undergraduate organizers and the junior participants were greatly inspired by the experience.

At the one-day workshop, participants were engaged in a series of activities involving computing concepts such as coding, encryption, and sorting. In his opening speech, our President Professor Peter Mathieson encouraged young girls to challenge stereotypes and embrace new opportunities that our society has to offer in traditionally male-dominated sectors, including research, technology and computer science. “Technology is fundamentally about problem solving, and there’s no gender-specific environment to that,” he said. A number of distinguished women tech leaders also shared their career development journeys. Starting from March, participants will also be visiting tech giants such as Lenovo, Microsoft (Hong Kong), IBM, and Google to gain a deeper understanding of the tech industry.

“Girls4Tech 2016” was organized by TecHKU, short for The HKU Journal of Technology, formed by a group of students from the Faculties of Engineering and Social Sciences. This annual event aims to nurture computational thinking in secondary school girls and to inspire them on possibilities of developing a career in the tech sector. “We noticed that most companies in the region were trying to bridge the gender equity gap in technology by organizing similar events for university students, but we believed that such interests would be best triggered at a younger age,” said Vikay Narayen, student founder and consultant of TecHKU. According to a feedback survey conducted by TecHKU, 86.9% of the 85 respondents said they became more interested in tech after the event; 11% more reflected they are now interested to study ICT for the HKDSEs after joining the event.

(Source: TecHKU)

TELI was in full support of this event because we recognise the need to provide a broad range of knowledge exchange opportunities for our next generation, and we see the great potential of having our students empower their younger fellows. We deeply appreciate TecHKU’s initiative, which might have created life-long impact in the girls’ lives.

More photos of the event can be found on our Facebook and Instagram.
Stay tuned for more reports on the event.

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Organized by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL), E-learning Pedagogical Support Unit (EPSU) and Technology-Enriched Learning Initiative (TELI)

Speakers: Dr. Lily Zeng, Assistant Professor, CETL
Professor Ricky Kwok, Associate Vice-President (Teaching and Learning)
Date : 8 March, 2016 (Tuesday)
Time : 12:45pm – 2:00pm
Venue : Room 321, Run Run Shaw Building (Main Campus), HKU

About the Joint Workshop

Many teachers who are planning to flip their classes might agree that moving traditional lectures online is an effective way to deliver instructional materials. More importantly, it can also make room for quality interactions between teachers and students. However, after the flip, what kind of learning opportunities can we create to engage, inspire, provoke, or even shock our students in the face-to-face sessions, the “face time”? How should face time and screen time be meaningfully blended? In this workshop, you will hear cases of flipped classes in different disciplines, analyze the key elements of the pedagogical strategies used in face time, identify the activities that you might be able to use, and come away with initial plans for a flipped class. Be sure to bring your wireless device and a lesson that you are considering flipping to work on!

This workshop is open to the first 42 registered participants to ensure that there is enough time to accommodate questions, provide comments, and give feedback for each participant.

Registration

For enquiries, please contact Miss Bonnie Yu by email yka0201@hku.hk.

Workshop video

Developing small private online courses (SPOC) is an increasingly popular teaching strategy in higher education. On January 26th, TELI’s SPOC team organized an interactive workshop offering participants a rare opportunity to gain hands-on experience in creating a video that can serve as an online lecture.

One clear advantage of restructuring a lecture into a series of short online videos is portability across time and space – it allows students to learn anytime, anywhere. Students are free to pause and review sections of the videos, which is not possible in traditional lectures. Condensing a two-hour lecture into short videos of about 6 minutes each also tend to be more engaging.

While creating an online course may seem a daunting task, it can actually be done by following a simple three-step approach: revisiting the course structure, storyboarding and scripting, then studio filming. At the workshop, a mock-up filming studio was set up to give our participants a taste of video production. They were invited to draft a short script in groups and speak in front of the camera and a green or blue screen that can be chroma-keyed into any background that you like. The responses were positive overall. Participants commented that this experience made them “feel much more comfortable when someone tells [them] ‘let’s shoot a video’” and “it’s doable.”

The recordings were edited by our team and sent to individual participants after the workshop.

It is TELI’s mission to provide technological support to teachers in creating online videos and e-learning materials. We are re-running this interactive workshop in March – please contact us​ to schedule your session.

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