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ipe

Guest blogger series: Dr. Fred Ganotice, Jr.
Dr. Fred Ganotice, Jr. serves as the program coordinator of Interprofessional education of the Bau Institute of Medical and Health Sciences Education. Through his TDG-supported project called “Finetuning the application exercise and facilitation strategies of interprofessional education”, he works to improve further the IPE model currently being implemented.

Interprofessional Education (IPE) aims to break educational silos by putting students from diverse backgrounds to be better collaborators by learning with, from, and about each other, thus managing power hierarchies in the workplace. Teamwork and collaboration are important learning competencies to help prepare future health professionals reshape both the process (e.g., from silos to interprofessional team-based care) of health care management and health outcomes. IPE becomes a means within which future healthcare professionals become collaborative practice ready.

This year, IPE has been scaled-up to include both face-to-face IPE and “online asynchronous and synchronous IPE” and are participated in by five disciplines: Chinese Medicine, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Social Work. The outbreak of coronavirus disease has prompted the inclusion of online IPE which helps mitigate the potential health risks of large student gatherings. Three of the four IPE lessons have been transformed into online IPE.

IPE Lesson Mode Duration Student Participants
1. Anticoagulation therapy Face-to-face January 19, 2020 MBBS – 116
Nursing – 123
Pharmacy – 30
Total 269
2. Multiple drugs and complementary therapies Online Feb 10 – 22, 2020 MBBS – 114
Nursing – 84
Pharmacy – 30
Chinese Med – 9
Total 237
3. Depression Online March 2 – 14, 2020 MBBS – 116
Nursing – 93
Chinese Med -24
Social Work – 22
Total 255
4. Cancer Online March 16 – 28, 2020 MBBS – 114
Nursing – 93
Chinese Med -15
Social Work – 22
Total 274

The online IPE is built around asynchronous self-paced interprofessional team-based activities, online discussion teams, and healthcare planning exercises to develop teamwork skills among students. The content experts go live for an online synchronous interactive discussion while students participate via Zoom in the convenience of their homes.

screencap1_newDr George L. Tipoe, BIMHSE Director, facilitates interteam discussion in IPE Anticoagulation Therapy

screencap1_newThe teachers involved in IPE Multiple drugs and complementary therapies process the IPE team activities

screencap1_newThe sequence of activities for Online synchronous and asynchronous IPE.

screencap1_new
screencap1_newSample of discussion board entries of a team in readiness assurance test (tRAT)

To promote teamwork and collaboration among teams, they are instructed to represent the knowledge of their discipline in the discussion of multiple-choice questions as a team. We used the within team differences in perspectives to push them to discuss more and be respectful to other disciplines.

An important part of Online IPE is the formulation of interprofessional care plans, which provides students from four to five disciplines the chance to integrate their collective intelligence and expertise in the management of patients.

screencap1_newSample team care plan developed based on a clinical case (asynchronous team activity)

This year, infographics on guidelines in facilitating interteam discussion is made available to the teachers to help them be more equipped in developing amongst teams desirable teamwork skills e.g., collaborative decision making and problem solving, teamwork and collaboration, communication (ability to listen and express), negotiation, respect for the opinion of other disciplines (e.g., accommodate/reconcile differences in perspectives), and social skills (e.g., being comfortable in team).

screencap1_newGuidelines to facilitate IPE interteam discussion (developed through the help of CETL and TELi)

Initial evaluation data provide sources of reflection for the program implementers. For example, the following realization from a student is a good point for reflection: “I used to think that doctors always play the most significant role in healthcare. I realized that it’s not – as they also need the support of other disciplines and it’s critical to form an interprofessional team in order to provide quality care for the patients. In the future I plan to exchange idea and collaborate with peers from different disciplines” (lifted verbatim).

If you want to learn more about online IPE, please contact Dr. George L. Tipoe (tgeorge@hku.hk) or Dr. Fred A. Ganotice, Jr., (ganotc75@hku.hk) at Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Bau Institute of Health Sciences Education. If you want to know the technical aspects of running large classes, you may contact the Technology-Enriched Learning Initiative (TELI) via enquiry@teli.hku.hk.

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State, Law and the Economy I

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About this course

State, Law and the Economy I

Economic concepts often give a fresh and unobvious perspective when applied to the study of how the state, law, and the economy functions and are interrelated. This course teaches students essential economic concepts in an intuitive manner relevant to the study of political economy.

The use of interdisciplinary materials, empirical inference, game theoretic simulation, and cross-referencing with political philosophies and well-known historical cases, provide students an opportunity to connect different perspectives and deepen their understanding of the democratic state in a free society using economic concepts.

Part One of a four-part course on the economic analysis of the state, law, and the economy and their interrelationships. Part one studies the contractual nature of the state, the logic of collective action, liberty and the theory of the democratic state.

Weekly Highlights

Week1: Some Methodological Issues and Collective Choice

week1
Lectures 1 and 2 consider some specific concerns in applying economic analysis to the study of collective action, namely, (1) the rationality assumption, (2) the use of simplifying models, and (3) the problem of the fallacy of composition in studying collective action. Then we will explore the contractual nature of the state. We consider why the sum of individual choices is not collective choice. The reasons for collective choices are to achieve allocative efficiency and redistribution.

Week2: Pure Public Goods and Coase Theorem

week2
Lecture 3 and 4 utilizes game theory to explain how the structure of payoffs characterizes political choices, including the provision of public goods. We then learn how market externalities can be corrected through collective action and consider the implications of the Coase theorem for public intervention.

Week3: Violence and the Origins of the State and Wisdom of Philosophers

week3
Lecture 5 and 6 considers how the emergence of state institutions with human civilization has reduced violence and life loss. The purpose of moral and political philosophies, from Plato and Aristotle to Locke, Rousseau, and Marx has sought to find practical or ideal political arrangements where humankind can live together in peace and flourish.

Week4: Two Concepts of Liberty, Theory of Social Choice and the Theory of Democracy

week4
Lectures 7 and 8 introduce two concepts of liberty: negative and positive liberty. The two interpretations of liberty are then related to liberal versus populist democracy through the application of social choice theory. We examine how when applied to voting and the design of political institutions, social choice theory provides a new perspective on the just society considered by political philosophers from Plato to Marx.

Week5: The Art of Political Manipulation

week5
Lecture 9 studies how heresthetics—the use of rhetoric and strategic structuring of social choice—is used to achieve a desired political outcome. The example of Abraham Lincoln in ending slavery is used as an illustration.
 

Date : 18 March 2020 (Wednesday)
Time : 12:30pm – 1:30pm
Venue : To be held virtually by Zoom
Speaker : Dr Leon Lei, Ms Crystal Luo, Ms. Sharon Keung

Registration link: http://bit.ly/hku_online_assessment

Same as other dimensions of teaching and learning, course assessment has been digitizing extensively since the past decade. Despite multiple-choice question banks, technology solutions such as online proctoring, sophisticated essay marking (e.g. Turnitin GradeMark), peer-grading systems (e.g. Turnitin PeerMark) have been introduced for online learning. Meanwhile, there is a pressing need for teachers to evaluate students’ performance within and beyond the campus. Teachers may worry conducting such online assessment requires high digital literacy skills, some also worry online learning may include the risk of incurring academic misconduct behaviour in online learning.

Through the workshop, participants are expected to have a reflection on better practices and design considerations in online assessment. Upon completion of this seminar, the participants will be able to:

  • Understand the potential and affordances of online assessment
  • Understand the mechanism of conducting basic online test proctoring
  • Design an assignment or a quiz activity on HKU Moodle

During class suspension at HKU, instructors have to switch to online teaching to deliver course content. There are two effective ways for instructors to deliver online teaching:  one is to produce pre-recorded videos and the other is to schedule live teaching sessions with students. They serve different purposes. We provide students with basic knowledge of a subject by producing pre-recorded videos, in which instructors may prepare PowerPoint slides and explain the subject content with their voice and talking head recorded. After students gain sufficient basic knowledge of a subject, in live teaching, instructors can make use of the precious time to interact with students to probe their understanding of the subject, address their questions and discuss more advanced topics. Live teaching is an invaluable opportunity for students to interact with and learn from their peers and their instructors. 

The HKU Learning Management System Moodle (https://moodle.hku.hk/) is our central online learning resource for course teachers to share engaging online learning content with their students. In particular, the Panopto system (http://lecturecapture.hku.hk/), a centrally managed video capture solution, is integrated seamlessly with the Moodle system to enable instructors to record or upload lecture videos for sharing with students in Moodle. A step-by-step guide for instructors can be found here: https://hku.to/elearn_video

As for live teaching, HKU ITS has entered a campus license with Zoom (http://hku.zoom.us/). Using features like screen sharing, chatroom and whiteboard, instructors can schedule meetings to have rich real-time interaction with their students. In addition, meetings can be recorded and put on Moodle for students to revise later. 

The following diagram summarizes the use of different tools for online teaching. More advice for instructors can be found here: https://hku.to/elearn_quickstart

In TELI, we are working closely with ITS colleagues to provide prompt support to teachers and students as to the use of the above-mentioned tools. For example, we are monitoring the workload and response time of the Moodle and Panopto systems. When needed, the capability of the two servers (i.e., processor, memory and disk space) will be enhanced. In addition, TELI colleagues Leon Lei (9162 3384) and Tyrone Kwok (5964 8396) are happy to provide individual consultation to teachers via WhatsApp. 

Written by Dr Tyrone Kwok, Dr Leon Lei, Ms Crystal Luo and Ms Sharon Keung

We believed most of us agreed that Hong Kong is undergoing a difficult period. Due to the pandemic outbreak in these few weeks, face-to-face classes have been suspended, and all teaching and learning activities have to be converted into an online format. As many learning activities have already been designed for face-to-face teaching and learning before the outbreak, it is a challenge for teachers to redesign them within a short period of time as well as to facilitate engaging and productive synchronous/asynchronous online sessions. Moreover, students also struggle to fully immerse themselves in the online learning environment due to the limitations of the offline environment in Hong Kong.

To help teachers to overcome the challenges, TELI has developed a full list of supporting resources:

  • E-learning Quick Start Guide: This guide serves as a portal of online resources provided to HKU staff and students (including Powerpoint, Zoom, Panopto and Moodle). It briefly describes how online learning can be adopted in different teaching context and styles. The guide includes technical demonstrations of the tools as well as tips and strategies for creating an engaging online learning session for students. Additional resources such as teacher showcases, good practices on blended/online learning and video production are also provided in this guide. A student version of this quick start guide is also available for students (link).
  • Online Learning FAQ Video Channel: Teachers can quickly learn the basics of PowerPoint, Panopto, Zoom and other related tools through step-by-step demonstrations and explanations.
  • Real-time Online E-learning Consultation Channel: Teachers can contact the E-learning Technologists at TELI for a one-to-one consultation session on questions related to online T&L.
    • Leon Lei (9162 3384) and Tyrone Kwok (5964 8396) who can both be reached via WhatsApp text messages.
  • Faculty-/Department-level Face-to-face Training: Hands-on training and deep-dive tool demonstrations on online learning tools can be provided to teachers on demand. The training will also include showcase sharing by teachers. Please contact Dr Leon Lei (culei@hku.hk) for training arrangements.

Your health and safety are always our top priority. Please stay vigilant and continue to make personal health your top priority. 

Written by Dr Leon Lei, Ms Crystal Luo, Ms Sharon Keung and Dr Tyrone Kwok

ppp

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About this course

“If history is our guide, we can assume that the battle between the intellect and will of the human species and the extraordinary adaptability of microbes will be never-ending.” (1)

Despite all the remarkable technological breakthroughs that we have made over the past few decades, the threat from infectious diseases remain prevalent, with increased global mobility resulting in its significantly accelerated spread. This is all the more evident with the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, which is showing no signs of slowing down.

In the age of information overload, it is crucial to have access to verified facts and figures regarding appropriate public health protocols and precautionary measure – it acts as means of reducing anxiety and fears regarding infectious diseases, and above all a crucial first line of defense against misinformation.

In this course, we will look at the fundamental scientific principles underlying epidemics and the public health actions behind their prevention and control in the 21st century, with follow-up discussions and supplementary content on how these concepts may be helpful to us in better understanding the COVID-19 outbreak.

This is the second (spread of infectious diseases) of the four courses, and will cover the following topics:

  • Basic Concepts in Infectious Disease Epidemiology
  • Epidemiologic Triangle: The Pathogen, The Host and The Environment
  • Evidence Synthesis
  • Infectious Disease Modelling

Week 1
Infectious Disease Epidemiology – Tracking Infectious Diseases + Discourse with Epidemiologists on COVID-19 Outbreak

week1
The incubation period is frequently mentioned in the context of the 14-day quarantine protocol for the recent COVID-19 outbreak, but have you ever wondered what the incubation period really means, and how it is relevant to stopping the spread of diseases? In the first week of this course, you will be introduced to basic concepts in infectious disease epidemiology, such as the epidemic curve, incubation period and its uses, transmissibility of communicable diseases, timescale of disease transmission, severity of infectious disease, and difficulties associated with severity estimation. After class discussions held with epidemiologists and various experts of the field will also address the recent outbreak.

Week 2
Epidemiological Triangle ­- Understanding Disease Transmission and Examining the Spread of COVID-19 (Supplementary Reading)

week2
Over the course of less than a month, the new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) had spread from Wuhan China to far reaches of the world including Europe and North America; what are some human factors associated with the spread of a virus, and how are other extraneous factors implicated in outbreaks such as this? The three main pillars that make up the epidemiologic triangle (pathogen, host, and environment) will be explained as means to understanding the spread of disease. In addition, the evolution of pathogens will be examined through case studies on the Myxoma virus, the human immunodeficiency virus, and antimicrobial resistance. Finally, host factors that affect disease transmission and severity such as age and sexual mixing will be addressed. A supplementary module will include discourse on influenza immunity and transmission in time, age and space, while supplementary reading on “Real-time nowcast and forecast on the extent of the COVID-19 outbreak, domestic and international spread” will further explore concepts discussed in class.

Week 3
Infectious Disease Modeling – Mathematical Modeling of Infectious Diseases and Forecasting of the COVID-19 Outbreak (Supplementary Reading)

week3
Numerous recent studies have forecasted the geographical spread and peak of outbreak of COVID-19, but many may be curious to know how these estimations made, and what evidence there is to lend support to these hypotheses. In the final week, you will be introduced to the mathematical modeling of infectious disease, specifically the susceptible-infectious-recovered (SIR) model, and its role as a tool for evidence synthesis. You will also identify the various elements of uncertainty that may occur at all stages of the modeling process. The supplementary module of the week will address the concept of precision public health, while supplementary reading on “Nowcasting and forecasting the potential domestic and international spread of the 2019-nCoV outbreak originating in Wuhan, China: a modelling study” will examine the dynamics of infectious diseases through mathematical modelling.

 

Join Epidemics II now.

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and LinkedIn for more updates!

—-
(1) Fauci AS, Touchette NA, Folkers GK. Emerging Infectious Diseases: a 10-Year Perspective from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Emerg Infect Dis 2005 Apr; 11(4):519-25.

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Online Teaching and Learning (For Staff)

Dear colleagues

Update on Online Teaching and Learning Resources (February 7, 2020)

(Please also read our FAQs dated February 19, 2020.)

The HKU Learning Management System Moodle is our central online learning resource for course teachers and their students.  Moodle supports teachers, course TAs, instructors and administrators to create flexible and engaging online learning content.  Online support resources such as FAQs, user guides and short video tutorials to help teachers get started with Moodle are available:

The Panopto – Lecture Capture Service (LCS) and Zoom can both be used for lecture capture. Teachers are reminded to record the online lecture as far as possible so that students who cannot attend the real-time session can play back the video later on. In addition, students should be allowed the option of muting the mic and video function if they so wish.

ITS has upgraded the server capacity for video capture through Panopto. The Panopto recorder software can be downloaded from https://lecturecapture.hku.hk. If you face capacity problems with other platforms, Panopto is a good default option.

HKU has also secured a campus license with Zoom, a video conferencing service for use by staff and students.  Zoom conferencing can be used for online meetings, classes, interviews, etc. Details are available at  https://www.its.hku.hk/services/communication/conferencing/zoom. The Faculty of Education’s guidelines are pasted at the end of this message.

Two DIY rooms in TIPS are configured for both Panopto and Zoom. All 159 centrally-timetabled classrooms and lecture theatres are configured for Panopto. Teachers may use these rooms for online lecturing. DIY rooms in TIPS can be booked online, and central classrooms can be booked with the Exams Office by sending an email to roombook@hku.hk or calling the hotline: 2859 2445. Please note that all classrooms originally assigned for undergraduate classes this semester have already been cancelled, so room availability is very good.

A series of TELI videos on how to use Panopto, Zoom and Moodle can be found here: https://hku.to/OnlineLearningFAQ

An e-learning quick start guide provided by TeLi can be found here: https://hku.to/elearn_quickstart

For ITS e-learning support, please email ithelp@hku.hk, or call 3917 0123 in office hours.

To advise on online T&L options, TELI colleagues offer individual online clinic sessions every working day. Teachers can contact Dr. Leon Lei or Dr. Tyrone Kwok for one-to-one consultation through WhatsApp. Their contact numbers are:-

Leon Lei: 9162 3384
Tyrone Kwok: 5964 8396

Leon and Tyrone will respond by text message for basic enquiries. They will create a one-on-one Zoom meeting for more complex enquiries. (How to join a Zoom meeting: https://youtu.be/vFhAEoCF7jg)

Below this message I’m resending for easy reference some information about online resources circulated to all colleagues in November 2019.

Renewed thanks to all. As ever, please drop me a line with queries.

 

Best wishes, Ian

Professor Ian Holliday
Vice-President (Teaching and Learning)
The University of Hong Kong

***

Extract from my email of November 15, 2019:

There is a good collection of e-resources (e-journals, e-books, etc) available for access online.  Visit Find@HKUL (http://find.lib.hku.hk) or the Electronic Resources (https://libguides.lib.hku.hk/az.php).  Teachers can set up a recommended resource list using ReadingList@HKUL (https://libguides.lib.hku.hk/readinglist).  Ask-a-Librarian (Email: libis@hku.hk) if you have questions.

A one-stop resource page to support both asynchronous and synchronous online learning can be found at the University’s Teaching and Learning website: https://tl.hku.hk/. Please check this page from time to time as we provide more updates over the next few days.

Some suggested online teaching and learning resources kindly provided by the Faculty of Education are listed below.

Synchronous: Hosting a live online meeting with students.

Asynchronous: Uploading pre-recorded videos to Moodle

Tips:

  • Try a 1-2 minute test to check the video/audio quality before starting a full lecture recording.
  • Use a standalone microphone attached to your laptop/PC or earphones with microphones for better audio quality.
  • Keep the recording to a reasonable length or separate it into sections.

 

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Online Teaching and Learning (For Student)

Dear undergraduate students

As you know, we’ll move all UG courses online for the two weeks till February 17. The add/drop period for UG students has already been extended to 4pm, February 21. I’m writing to address two issues generated by these arrangements.

Viewing Course Content on Moodle during Add/Drop Period

The point of the add/drop period is to allow students to shop around for the courses that suit their needs and interests. That is hard to do online, however, because students only have Moodle access to the courses for which they’re registered. We’ve therefore added a new feature, “Enrol me”, to enable students to access additional courses on Moodle during add/drop period:-

  1. Directly login http://moodle.hku.hk
  2. Search for the Moodle course code on the Moodle homepage
  3. Click the “Enrol me” button on the homepage of the Moodle course.

“Enrol me” User Guide: http://moodle-support.hku.hk/sites/Moodle_enrol_me.pdf

Each student can use the “Enrol me” function for a small number of Moodle courses in addition to the usual maximum official course enrollment limit.

Please be reminded that the “Enrol me” feature allows you to access course information on Moodle until February 21 without actual enrolment. You must still formally add/drop courses via SIS by 4pm, February 21.

Accessing Moodle and Panopto from the Internet

As with the online exam period in December 2019, we have created customized network connection channels to help students access HKU’s Moodle from the Internet:

  1. Login to the HKU Portal <https://hkuportal.hku.hk>, click the “My eLearning” tab and select the Moodle course you’re interested in
  2. Visit the official hyperlinks of Moodle <https://moodle.hku.hk/> and Panopto <https://lecturecapture.hku.hk
  3. If you experience any problems because of restrictions on access, please login to HKUVPN before step 1 or 2
     – HKUVPN user guide at <https://www.its.hku.hk/documentation/guide/network/remote/hkuvpn2fa>
  4. If you’re having difficulties in accessing from Mainland China, please try this link of Moodle <https://112.74.76.87:8091/> and Panopto <https://112.74.76.87:8082/>.

If you encounter any problems, please: 

Best wishes, Ian  

Professor Ian Holliday
Vice-President (Teaching and Learning)
The University of Hong Kong

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Online Teaching and Learning (For Staff)

Dear colleagues

I’m writing to follow up on the President’s January 25 message announcing class suspension at HKU until February 17.

In this period we will again switch to online T&L. Where possible, we encourage instructors to use lecture capture and chat rooms to deliver course content. Teaching activities that cannot be delivered virtually will need to be postponed until after February 17.

The HKU Learning Management System Moodle is our central online learning resource for course teachers and their students.  Moodle supports teachers, course TAs, instructors and administrators to create flexible and engaging online learning content for supporting teaching.  Online support resources such as FAQs, user guides and short video tutorials to help teachers get started with Moodle are available:

ITS has entered a campus license with Zoom, a video conferencing service, for use by staff and students for facilitating their work and studies.  Zoom conferencing can be used for online meetings, classes, interviews, etc. Details are available at  https://www.its.hku.hk/services/communication/conferencing/zoom, or the guidelines provided by Faculty of Education at the end of this email.

The Panopto – Lecture Capture Service (LCS) is based on a centrally managed video capture solution supported by the Panopto system. All 159 centrally timetabled classrooms and lecture theatres are Panopto ready.  More details are available on the LES website

Integration of Panopto and Moodle – Teachers who have Moodle courses can post pancasts for students to view more easily.  At fingertips, the link to a pancast can be inserted to a Moodle block of a teacher’s Moodle course for viewing limited to their students only.  The Panopto recorder software is pre-installed in the classroom PCs.  For personal PC or devices, under the campus license, teachers can download it from http://lecturecapture.hku.hk to install on their own devices.

For the abovementioned e-learning support provided by Information Technology Services (ITS), please visit http://moodle-support.hku.hk/resources, email ithelp@hku.hk, or call 3917 0123 in office hours.

To advise on online T&L options, TELI colleagues will offer individual online clinic sessions each working day from January 29 onwards. Teachers can contact Dr. Leon Lei or Dr. Tyrone Kwok for one-to-one consultation through Whatsapp Mobile app or Desktop app (https://web.whatsapp.com/). Their contact numbers are:-

Leon Lei: 9162 3384
Tyrone Kwok: 5964 8396

Leon and Tyrone will respond through text-based messages for basic inquiries. They will create one-to-one Zoom meeting for tool demonstrations when necessary. (How to join a Zoom meeting: https://youtu.be/vFhAEoCF7jg)

Below this message I’m resending for easy reference some information about online resources circulated to all colleagues in November 2019.

Renewed thanks to all. As ever, please drop me a line with queries.

Best wishes, Ian

Professor Ian Holliday
Vice-President (Teaching and Learning)
The University of Hong Kong

***

Extract from my email of November 15, 2019:

There is a good collection of e-resources (e-journals, e-books, etc) available for access online.  Visit Find@HKUL (http://find.lib.hku.hk) or the Electronic Resources (https://libguides.lib.hku.hk/az.php).  Teachers can set up a recommended resource list using ReadingList@HKUL (https://libguides.lib.hku.hk/readinglist).  Ask-a-Librarian (Email: libis@hku.hk) if you have questions.

A one-stop resource page to support both asynchronous and synchronous online learning can be found at the University’s Teaching and Learning website: https://tl.hku.hk/. Please check this page from time to time as we provide more updates over the next few days.

Some suggested online teaching and learning resources kindly provided by the Faculty of Education are listed below.

Synchronous: Hosting a live online meeting with students.

Asynchronous: Uploading pre-recorded videos to Moodle

Tips:

  • Try a 1-2 minute test to check the video/audio quality before starting a full lecture recording.
  • Use a standalone microphone attached to your laptop/PC or earphones with microphones for better audio quality.
  • Keep the recording to a reasonable length or separate it into sections.

 

Related Items 

Online Teaching and Learning (For Student)

The add/drop period for Semester 2 for all undergraduate programmes will be extended to February 21, 2020.

Dear students

I’m writing to follow up on the President’s January 25 message announcing class suspension at HKU until February 17.

In this period we will again switch to online T&L. Where possible, teachers will use lecture capture and chat rooms to deliver course content. Teaching activities that cannot be delivered virtually will be postponed until after February 17.

The add/drop period for the second semester will still close at 4:00pm on February 11. Please engage actively with your courses over the next couple of weeks to ensure you enrol in the right set of courses.

As with OLEX, our online exam platform, we will make arrangements to ensure that students from all parts of the world are able to access HKU’s online T&L content. Via Moodle is the best way to keep in touch with your teachers and courses.

Stay safe and, as ever, please drop me a line with queries.

Best wishes, Ian

Professor Ian Holliday
Vice-President (Teaching and Learning)
The University of Hong Kong

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