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TIPS_opens_long_banner

TELI’s partners and friends gathered on June 8, 2018 to celebrate the grand opening of the Teaching Innovation Production Studio (TIPS) – a professional filming studio for all HKU teachers and students!

Being the first of its kind in HKU, TIPS is a high-quality environment for multimedia production such as filming or sound recording. In this studio, you will enjoy professional multimedia support and advisory services from TELI in creating your very own videos. Compared to TELI’s previous temporary filming studio, the TIPS has been equipped with new hardwares (such as ARRI lighting) and upgraded softwares.

TIPS_opensA professional filming studio for all HKU teachers and students!

TIPS_opensTHANK YOU for celebrating the opening with us!

The entire studio is a large-scale reconfiguration of learning space under the Learning Environment Services (LES), located near the Chi Wah Learning Commons. The completion of this project would not be possible without the efforts and kind help from the President’s Office, LES, Estates Office, Common Core Office, Faculty of Social Sciences to name a few.

drawing-competitionCaption: Professor Ian Holliday (Vice-President (Teaching & Learning)) and Professor Ricky Kwok, (Associate Vice-President (Teaching & Learning)) unveil the TIPS door plaque

There are two types of rooms in TIPS: 1. The Main Studio and 2. DIY workstations. TELI’s Multimedia team will offer support in setting up and filming.

Main Studio: Green Screen Filming with Professional Support from TELI
Various modes of filming and recording can be done in our full-fledged main studio, equipped with green screen wall, ARRI lights and professional acoustic treatment set-up which minimizes the noise level.

TIPS_opensOur Main Studio

DIY Workstations – Your Very Own Creative Space
TIPS_opensDIY workstation for self-service digital media capturing

Two small but well-equipped rooms provide all you would need for Do-It-Yourself (DIY) filming. With the full range of self-service digital media capturing devices available, users can create online lectures, flipped classroom activities, blended learning materials and tutorial videos all by themselves. Using the Open Broadcaster Software (OBS), customized background can be previewed and inserted as a teacher films in front of a green screen wall.

TIPS_opensThe DIY workstations offer private workspaces where you can enjoy the fun of creating videos all by yourself.

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Studio Tour
If you are eager to explore the facilities of TIPS, please contact enquiry@teli.hku.hk for arrangement of studio tours.

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Have you ever questioned where in the world do we live, and what lies beyond the visible world? These have been intriguing questions for humans since 5000 years ago, for which our ancestors actively sought answers and went on expeditions into deep space, just to answer the existential question: where’s our place in the Universe?

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On June 2, 2018, Professor Sun Kwok held a public lecture in the Hong Kong Space Museum’s Lecture Theatre, attracting a crowd of over a hundred. Students, professionals, families and astronomy enthusiasts flocked to listen to Professor Kwok speak about how man made sense of our surrounding environment, and the development of a scientific mind throughout this process.

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Professor Kwok illustrated how our ancestors’ practical needs of planning for agriculture prompted them to closely observe the environment, turning their attention to the skies to examine how stars moved. From observations, humans began to imagine, hypothesize and correlate phenomena, eventually coming up with theories to explain how the celestial sky works. Slight discrepancies of actual observations with proposed theories sent them thinking further, resulting in more accurate explanations of the nature being born, and in the long course of history, the development of the scientific way of thinking and rational mind. Man deconstructed and constructed knowledge and built up a legacy of what we have today – a chest full of rich astronomical understanding to our disposal. Understanding how we have come this far is equally important as knowing what our current comprehension of the Universe is.

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Towards the end of the lecture, Professor Kwok engaged in a lively exchange of questions and answers with the audience, where visitors raised curious questions about specific details of the talk. Furthermore, visitors had an enjoyable time trying out the Armillary sphere app, co-developed by HKU TELI and Professor Kwok. With the aid of animated instructional videos and the guidance of TELI’s staff, visitors learnt how to operate this digitized ancient instrument. The app is powerful enough to predict the Sun’s motion on any given altitude, and some visitors even tried to work out the sunrise and sunset times on their birthdays!

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Many also took the opportunity to learn about the upcoming free MOOC course Our Place in the Universe, launching on June 12, 2018 on EdX. If you missed the public lecture, here is your chance to embark on a journey with us through the stars and into history!

For more details of the public lecture, please refer to this post by the Hong Kong Space Museum. If you are interested in trying the Armillary Sphere app, you can also check out and download from this post: https://tl.hku.hk/2018/06/finding-our-place-in-the-universe-a-mooc/

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What is this course about?

Where are we? How did we come to realization of where we are? Our curiosity of our environment sparked countless questions, to which our ancestors observed, experimented, thought and calculated. It has brought us to deep ventures into the night sky and beyond. This is a tale of us, trying to finding our Place in the Universe.

Sneak Peek 1
Sneak Peek 2
Sneak Peek 3
Sneak Peek 4
Sneak Peek 5

The MOOC Our Place in the Universe goes online on June 12, 2018! Professor Sun Kwok, world-renowned astronomer and former Dean of Science of The University of Hong Kong, will take you on a 4-week journey through the stars, illustrating how our quest for understanding of the Universe over 5 millennia drove the development of rational thinking, and how of our perception of self and the world evolved through discoveries in astronomy.

What you will learn from this course:

  • How the scientific method was developed and its application
  • Qualitative and quantitative everyday astronomical phenomena and patterns and how such understanding has evolved over history
  • How to assess the effects of social environments on intellectual development through historical examples
  • The role of science in transforming our philosophical thinking

Register now!

The Universe in a Nutshell… no, in an App.
To spice up the learning experience, you will learn with a free app specifically designed for exploring the Universe, on top of informative videos and engaging animations.

ppp(Antonio Santucci’s Armillary Sphere, Museo Galileo)

Canto1Have you seen this fancy instrument in museums? This is an Armillary Sphere: for many millennia, our curious ancestors tracked the movement of the Sun, Moon and stars, and came up with patterns and theories to explain celestial movements. The Armillary Sphere crystallizes their astronomical discoveries and is a powerful instrument that can predict the time of Sunrise on any given day and on any altitude on Earth, and much more!

The Armillary Sphere is richly packed with astronomical information, waiting for you to explore and unlock by learning how to read it. It now has a digital incarnation in form of an app developed by Professor Kwok and TELI: download and learn how to use it by enrolling in the course!

AEDapp_banner  AEDapp_banner

Professor Kwok actively promotes learning about the beauty of our Universe to everyone. In addition to creating this MOOC, Professor Kwok has also delivered many lectures and public talks. One of which is his public lecture in the Hong Kong Space Museum on June 2, 2018. Our Place in the Universe is also available in form of a book, if you cannot wait for the course to start learning about the Universe, you can also check out his book on Amazon!

Related articles:

  1. RTHK31 programme “Our Scientists” episode featuring Professor Kwok
  2. Full Episode of “Our Scientists” on YouTube
  3. The man who dedicates his life to the stars, an interview with Professor Sun Kwok.
  4. 郭新:探索無涯宇宙 尋找生命起源[Translated: Sun Kwok: Exploring the boundless Universe and finding the origin of life] (The Stand News, Oct 27, 2017)
  5. 港大太空研究實驗室總監郭新宇宙知識改變教育思維[Translated: Chair Professor of Space Science and Director of Laboratory for Space Research Sun Kwok: Knowledge of the Universe changes educational thinking] (Hong Kong Economic Journal, Oct 27, 2017)
  6. Professor Kwok’s Public Lecture in the Hong Kong Space Museum on June 2, 2018

Interested in knowing more?
Follow the Facebook page of Our Place in the Universe for course updates and astronomical tidbits, HKU online learning Facebook and Twitter for fresh course teasers and news related to the course!

Interpreting Vernacular Architecture in Asia

Trailer and sneak previews

Register now!

About this course
This course is about architecture. But it’s not about grand structures such as monuments or royal palaces. Rather, it is about the built environment that the ordinary people live in. Instead of the architectural techniques, we use stories to understand the processes through which people make their building decisions.

We use Asia as the backdrop for the discussion of these topics. Partly because of Asia’s rich heritage and diversity, but also due to the unique complexity that the people in the region face as they go through rapid economic, social, and cultural changes.

In this examination of the connection between vernacular buildings and peoples’ cultural identities, we will review real-world examples and talk to experts in the field. At the end of this course, you will gain a unique perspective about the everyday environment that you live in – one perhaps that you’ve never had before. You will begin to understand and appreciate the value of the ordinary built environment around you.

Whether you are an avid architect or you simply just care about the built environment you live in, this course is for you.

What you’ll learn
Throughout the course, we will examine a wide range of topics, such as:

  • what is vernacular architecture
  • how climate and the availability of building materials influence building decisions
  • vernacular architecture in rural and urban settings
  • cultural sustainability and the conservation of the vernacular built environment.

Registration

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Explore the “secrets” of dental materials and digital dentistry together in the Materials in Oral Health MOOC offered by the best dental school in the world.

Register now!

Click here if you cannot access Youtube.

We all need healthy teeth, don’t we? Have you ever wondered why titanium, ceramics and some synthetic polymeric materials are the “materials of choice” in oral health care? What are the “secrets” that make these materials so special for dental implants and other restorative procedures?

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HKU Dentistry ranking No. 1 in the World has the vision to bring together the expertise and best practices in dental materials and biomaterials in the rerun of the MOOC Materials in Oral Health. The course is taught by a professional team of 30+ local, regional and international dentistry professionals and experts in dentistry and dental materials. What does this course cover? This 4-week Oral Biomaterials course unveils the exciting and unique properties and clinical implications of some state-of-the-art dental materials, including titanium, zirconia and modern synthetic polymer-based composites. We are also going to look at the crucial roles of CAD/CAM technology and 3D printing in dental application and digital orthodontics.

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Oral biomaterials today is an exciting area encompassing contributions from professional dentistry to biology, chemistry, physics, material science, mathematics and engineering. Whether you are dental practitioners and dental technicians, non-dental practitioners, dental students, university students from various disciplines, or senior secondary school students – this course will open your eyes to the magic of dental materials science. If you are a prospective university student, this course can open up new and exciting opportunities possibly leading to new career paths.

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Join us in the upcoming Materials in Oral Health MOOC on 23 June 2018 (HKT)!

Register now!

Follow our Facebook pages: HKU Online Learning and Dental Materials Science, Faculty of Dentistry, HKU!

Learners’ Stories
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Who are the Teachers in the MOOC course?

Week 1
Prof. Jukka Pekka Matinlinna (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Titanium and Its Application – Introduction to Dental Materials: Metal
  • Ceramics – Introduction to Dental Materials: Ceramics, Zirconia and Alumina
  • Surface Treatment – An Introduction to Surface Treatment Methods; Surface Treatment Method: Acid Etching
Dr. Nikos Mattheos (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Titanium and Its Application – Introduction to Materials used in Implant Dentistry
  • Ceramics – Dental Material Choice: Zirconia vs. Titanium
Prof. Niklaus Peter Lang (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Titanium and Its Application – What does the Future Hold for Titanium and Its Alloys?
Dr. Justin Paul Curtin (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Titanium and Its Application – Titanium and Its Applications in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Dr. Edmond Ho Nang Pow (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Ceramics – Ceramic Materials Used in Restorative Dentistry, Introduction in Types and Indication
Prof. Timo Närhi (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Ceramics – The Development and Advantages of Glass Ceramics
Dr. Hamdi Hosni Hamama (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Surface Treatment – Acid Etching: Bonding to Enamel and Dentine
Week 2
Prof. Damien Walmsley (The University of Birmingham, UK)

  • Modern Composites – Choice of Dental Fillings: Silver or Composites
Prof. Pekka Vallittu (The University of Turku, Finland)

  • Modern Composites – An Overview of Fibre-Reinforced Composite (FRC) in
    Dentistry; Fibre-Reinforced Composite (FRC) : Chemistry, Properties, Fibre Types and Orientation; Applications of Fibre-Reinforced Composite (FRC) in Dentistry
Prof. Jukka Pekka Matinlinna (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Modern Cements – An Introduction to Dental Cements
Prof. Cynthia Kar Yung Yiu (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Modern Cements – Introduction to Glass Ionomer Cements (GIC) and Resin-modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGIC)
Prof. Josette Camilleri (The University of Malta)

  • Modern Cements – Tricalcium Silicate-based Endodontic Cements – Properties and Modifications; Tricalcium Silicate-based Endodontic Cements – Radiopacifier; Tricalcium Silicate-based Endodontic Cements – Modifications in Mixing Liquids and Additives; Tricalcium Silicate-based Endodontic Cements – Hydraulic Properties and Bioactivities
Dr. Manikandan Ekambaram (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Clinical Material of Choice – Classification and Composition of Resin Dental Adhesives; Resin Adhesion to Tooth Tissues; Indications of Resin Dental Adhesives
Week 3
Dr. James Kit Hon Tsoi (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Digital Imaging – Introduction to Digital Dentistry
Dr. Walter Yu Hang Lam (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Digital Imaging – 3D Digital Stereophotogrammetry; Intraoral Scanner
  • Other Digital Techniques – Shade Matching
Prof. Michael Bornstein (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Digital Imaging – Introduction to Oral Radiology; The Basic Principles of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)
Dr. Andy Wai Kan Yeung (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Digital Imaging – Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)
Dr. Henry Wai Kuen Luk (The University of Hong Kong)

  • CAD/CAM and Digital Technology in Crown Fabrication, Digital Orthodontics and OMFS – CAD/CAM Technology in Crown Fabrication – An Introduction
Dr. John Yung Chuan Wu (The University of Hong Kong)

  • CAD/CAM and Digital Technology in Crown Fabrication, Digital Orthodontics and OMFS – Orthodontics – Diagnosis and Treatment Methods
Dr. Winnie Wing Shan Choi (The University of Hong Kong)

  • CAD/CAM and Digital Technology in Crown Fabrication, Digital Orthodontics and OMFS – Digital Dentistry in the Field of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Dr. Dominic King Lun Ho (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Other Digital Techniques – Digital Probing
Dr. Will Wei Qiao (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Other Digital Techniques – 3D Printing
Week 4
Dr. Tian Tian (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Adhesion Test and Bond Strength – Adhesion in Restorative Dentistry
Dr. Xiaozhuang Jin (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Adhesion Test and Bond Strength – A Finite Element Study on Dental Bond Strength Tests
Dr. Prasanna Neelakantan (The University of Hong Kong)

  • Adhesion Test and Bond Strength – Impact of Root Canal Irrigants on Root Filling Materials
Prof. Will Palin (The University of Birmingham)

  • Spectroscopy – Introduction to Spectroscopy
Prof. Edwin Kukk (The University of Turku, Finland)

  • Spectroscopy – Surface Analysis: What is a Surface?; Methods to Study the Surfaces: ESCA; ESCA Study of Titanium
Dr. Sari Granroth (The University of Turku, Finland)

  • Spectroscopy – ESCA Study of Titanium

Sneak Previews
Have a taster of what will be taught in this course!
(Sneak preview playlist here.)

The Application of Silicon and Silicon Compounds in Dentistry – Prof. Jukka Pekka Matinlinna
- “Silicones find a wide range of biomedical applications…”

Dental Material Choice: Zirconia vs Titanium – Prof. Niklaus P. Lang
- “Shortcomings with titanium are mostly aesthetic in nature…”

What is Digital Dentistry? – Dr. James Tsoi
- “Digital dentistry is one of the emerging fields in dentistry…”

Materials used in Implants – Dr. Nikos Mattheos
- “Osseointegration is a remarkable story of scientific discovery…”

More sneak previews here.

Assessment drives learning, and authentic assessment is key to producing better, deeper and more sustainable learning, said Professor Rick Glofcheski in the Authentic Assessment Symposium: The Transformation of Learning in Higher Education on May 3, 2018. In this Symposium, practitioners from various disciplines in HKU shared how they transform students’ learning experience with authentic assessments and technology.

Group photo of speakers, panel discussant and student representatives.
(From left to right) Back row: Professor Rick Glofcheski, Dr. Michael Botelho, Dr. Tim Wotherspoon, Mr. John Guest, Professor David Carless, Dr. Pamela Lee;
Middle row: Mr. David Lee, Ms. Alice Lee, Ms. Xiaotian Zhang, Ms. Tess Hogue, Ms. Vincci Mak, Ms. Tanya Kempston, Ms. Andrea Qi;
Front row: Ms. Sharon Kit-Yee Yuen, Mr. Santos Ting San Cheung, Mr. Anson Hui, Mr. Jun Seongjun Ko

What is Authentic Assessment?

An authentic assessment is one that requires real-world applications of learning. It often engages students in solving complex and ill-defined problems while taking into account the broad social context.

One of the fundamental goals of university education is to get students prepared for the challenges in the real world, and one way to facilitate their learning is to design authentic assessment tasks. As pointed out by Professor Glofcheski in his introduction, “students’ learning habits are to a large degree driven by how they will be assessed”, assessments are therefore vital in motivating students to make meaningful connections between doctrinal learning and the real world. This is where authenticity comes into play in assessment design.

Compared to conventional assessment, “[authentic assessment] produces better learning, deeper learning, and more sustainable learning”, said Professor Glofcheski.

The Use of Technology in Authentic Assessment Practices

Authentic assessment practices have been adopted across different disciplines in HKU, some of which are enabled by technology. Here are some examples:

Engaging Law Students with Reflective Media Diary

Professor Glofcheski engages his students with authentic news stories. In his tort law class, students are expected to identify and analyze news stories from a legal perspective, and create their own online news diary.

Unlike conventional examinations which often consists of hypothetical, artificial, and sometimes exaggerated problems, the reflective media diary engages students with real-world incidents. More importantly, it pushes them to exercise their own judgement in evaluating whether a news story is relevant to the subject matter. News writers normally do not use words such as “tort” or “negligence”, “this mimics how it will be in the real-world,” said Professor Glofcheski.

Facilitating Learning with Video Exemplars of Key Skills Performances in Dentistry

Dr. Michael Botelho from the Faculty of Dentistry facilitates learning and prepares students for assessment with videos. He video-recorded authentic, in-the-moment, evaluations of individual students’ performance and uploaded the videos to Moodle, an online learning management system (LMS), for all students to view. This gives students a clear idea about how they are going to be assessed and what clinical skills they are expected to develop, hence “opening the black box of stressful exams”. Since the videos are available online, students can review them multiple times before the actual assessment.

Assessing Medical Students Real-time with E-portfolio

Dr. Pamela Lee from the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine conducts real-time assessment of her students when they are practicing with real patients on-site. She observes students’ performance in the ward, an authentic workplace, and assess their practical competences on an e-portfolio system. This is an effective way to evaluate students’ competencies in practising in the real world.

(Left) Dr. Lee assessing students’ competence in examining real patients in the ward with an iPad.
(Right) The e-portfolio system for real-time assessment.

Facilitating Peer Assessment in Teaching Drama

“In authentic assessment, feedback is very important,” said Ms. Tanya Kempston, instructor of the Common Core Course CCHU9059 Making and Appreciating Drama. In her class, students perform drama in groups and assess their peers using an online tool called TEAMMATES.

In order to “make the assessment a more authentic experience for our students”, Ms. Kempston believes that assessment should not be unidirectional and carried out only by the course lecturer. Instead, students should be given the opportunity to provide formative qualitative feedback for their peers and grade them in terms of their contributions to the group.

Highlights of the Symposium

Check out the following recordings of the Symposium for more inspiring ideas in teaching and learning!

Authentic Assessment: Introduction and Example (Reflective Media Diary)

Professor Rick Glofcheski
Professor, Faculty of Law

Download the slides here.

Authentic Assessment in “Shaping the Landscape” at HKU

Ms. Vincci Mak
Senior Lecturer, Division of Landscape Architecture, Faculty of Architecture

Slides unavailable for privacy concerns

Authentic Assessment of Multi-domain Competencies for Independent Professional Practice

Dr. Pamela Lee
Clinical Associate Professor, Education Coordinator, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, LKS Faculty of Medicine

Download the slides here.

Authentic Assessment for Clinical Higher Order Thinking and Performance Skills

Dr. Michael Botelho
Clinical Associate Professor, Faculty of Dentistry

Download the slides here.

Authentic Assessment in Making and Appreciating Drama

Ms. Tanya Kempston
Lecturer, Faculty of Education

Download the slides here.

Authentic Assessment in Business Ethics

Mr. David Lee
Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Business and Economics

Download the slides here.

Authentic Assessment in International Relations

Dr. Courtney Fung
Assistant Professor, Department of Politics and Public Administration, Faculty of Social Sciences

Download the slides here.

Authentic Assessment with Analysing Film Clips

Mr. John Guest
Assistant Lecturer, Department of Linguistics, Faculty of Arts

Download the slides here.

Photographic Portfolio in Simplifying Complexity

Dr. Tim Wotherspoon
Lecturer, Faculty of Science

Download the slides here.

Authentic Assessment with Narrative Journalism

Ms. Tess Hogue
Lecturer, Centre for Applied English Studies

Download the slides here.

A 3D approach to integrated learning and assessment

Ms. Alice Lee
Associate Dean (Academic Affairs), Associate Professor, Faculty of Law

Transforming Your own Teaching

Authentic assessments generate positive backwash effect on students’ learning experience. Contact us if you are interested in enhancing learning with authentic assessment and technology.

Promoting and Enabling Technology-Enriched Learning: Challenges and StrategiesOrganized by Technology-Enriched Learning Initiative (TELI)

Details of the event:

Date : 30 May, 2018 (Wednesday)
Time : 4:00pm – 5:30pm
Venue : CPD 2.42 CPD 2.37, The Jockey Club Tower, Centennial Campus, The University of Hong Kong
(Due to overwhelming response, the venue has been changed to CPD 2.42)
Speaker : Toru Iiyoshi, Ph.D. (Kyoto University)
Respondent : Professor Ricky Kwok (The University of Hong Kong)

Abstract
Emerging educational innovations and methods, such as MOOCs, SPOCs, OERs, Flipped/Blended Learning, Gamification, AI, VR, AR, and Analytics, are radically transforming learning and teaching in higher education. This talk addresses how we can strategically promote and enable Technology-Enhanced Learning at institution, department, and individual levels. It also reviews and examines some exemplary efforts and practices that help guide us towards inventing the “next-generation” higher education. Finally, with the participants, the session explores how we can create an ecosystem that enables us to build necessary support capacity for more personalized, flexible, and on-demand lifelong learning.

About the Speaker
Toru Iiyoshi is Deputy Vice President for Education, and Director and a professor at the Center for the Promotion of Excellence in Higher Education of Kyoto University. He also serves as Executive Director of KyotoUx. Previously, he was a senior scholar and Director of the Knowledge Media Laboratory at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, and Senior Strategist in the Office of Educational Innovation and Technology at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Iiyoshi has served as a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Technology and Education as well as a visiting professor of the Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Information Studies at the University of Tokyo. He is a co-editor of the Carnegie Foundation book, Opening Up Education: The Collective Advancement of Education through Open Technology, Open Content, and Open Knowledge (MIT Press).

Registration

Enquiries should be directed to enquiry@teli.hku.hk.

HKU FinTech

Trailer and sneak previews

Registration

The University of Hong Kong (HKU) presents to you Asia’s first interdisciplinary Professional Certificate Program in FinTech on edX platform starting on May 15 2018.

FinTech – short for Financial Technology – is transforming the world of finance, especially in Asia at a rate never seen before. It is essential that professionals working in finance, technology, regulation or FinTech and students studying related subjects are equipped with in-demand FinTech knowledge and skills in today’s world of finance.

The FinTech Certificate Program compiles a series of three courses providing students with the tools to understand the interaction of finance and technology across the financial system as well as insight into the major technologies involved and the emerging business models and players in the industry. The first course Introduction to FinTech commences on May 15 and will be followed by two courses, FinTech Ethics and Risks and Blockchain and FinTech: Basics, Applications and Limitations, which will open over the coming year.

Each course brings together leading experts in FinTech from a range of backgrounds, including professors, market professionals and entrepreneurs. Designed by leading academics from a range of disciplines with input from industry leaders including among others SuperCharger, the Centre for Finance, Technology and Entrepreneurship, Microsoft, PwC, the Asia Capital Markets Institute, the Standard Chartered Bank, Thompson Reuters, and other partners in financial services, FinTech startups and Techfins sectors. In each course, you will gain greater understanding of the key trends in finance, technology and regulation, to better prepare for not only the opportunities but also the risks and challenges, including to traditional financial institutions and business models and those working in them.

Details


HKU FinTech

About this course
Over the past decade emerging technologies, paired with massive changes in regulations, have driven an unprecedented transformation of finance around the world. This process is happening more rapidly in China and Asia than anywhere else. This course is designed to explore FinTech fundamentals and help make sense of this wave of change as it happens.

New players such as start-ups and technology firms are challenging traditional players in finance, bringing democratization, inclusion and disruption. Companies engaged in social media, e-commerce, and telecommunications, as well as, companies and start-ups with large customer data pools, creative energies, and technical capacities, have brought competition to the existing financial infrastructure and are remaking the industry.

These transformations have not only created challenges but also unprecedented opportunities, building synergies with new business and regulatory models, particularly in emerging markets and developing countries. To meet these changes, 21st-century professionals and students must be equipped with up-to-date knowledge of the industry and its incredible evolution. This course – designed by HKU with the support of SuperCharger and the Centre for Finance, Technology and Education – is designed to enable learners with the necessary tools to understand the complex interaction of finance, technology and regulation.

In this course, through a series of video lectures, case studies, and assessments you will explore the major areas of FinTech including, beginning with What is FinTech before turning to Money, Payment and Emerging Technologies, Digital Finance and Alternative Finance, FinTech Regulation and RegTech, Data and Security, and the Future of Data Driven Finance, as well as, the core technologies driving FinTech including Blockchain, AI and Big Data. These will set the stage for understanding the FinTech landscape and ecosystem and grappling with the potential direction of future change.

What you’ll learn

  • The major areas in FinTech, including Money and Payment, Digital Finance and Alternative Finance
  • Major technological trends, including cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, AI and Big Data
  • FinTech Regulation and RegTech
  • The fundamental role of Data and Security in data-driven finance
  • Business and regulatory implications of technology for the financial industry
  • How regulations and RegTech are applied
  • Ways to analyse and evaluate what is driving technology innovation in Finance
  • How new technology impacts economies, markets, companies, and individuals

The key instructors of the course are:

Course Director
and Chief Instructor

Douglas Arner

Kerry Holdings Professor in Law,
The University of Hong Kong

Janos Barberis

Founder
SuperCharger FinTech Accelerator

Huy Nguyen Tran

CEO of The Disruptive Group &
Co-founder of CFTE,
Center for Finance, Technology
and Entrepreneurship

Ross Buckley

Professor of International Finance Law,
University of New South Wales

Brian Tang

Managing Director,
Asia Capital Markets Institute
(ACMI)

Henri Arslanian

FinTech & RegTech Leader,
PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC)
- China & HK



Details

Don’t forget to join us on Facebook or Twitter for more updates.

Related Items 

Thank you for joining us at the HKU EdTech Day on April 26, 2018! In this event, we showcased HKU’s pioneering efforts in developing e-learning and introduced the latest (and coolest!) technology to teachers, students and visitors. We were overwhelmed by the enthusiasm of our guests!

Highlights of the day

AR Sky Lantern
Make a wish

Wish upon a lantern

AR Dinosaur
Free photo taking with our 3D Gigantoraptor

Filming Station Photo-taking
Free photo taking in our mini studio
A unique souvenir to bring home!

VR Tilt Brush

Unleash your creativity – 3D painting in the air!

VR Rock Climbing

Fire up your adventurous spirit!

Our Place in the Universe

Explore the wonders of the Universe with the Armillary Sphere app
* This app will be used in our upcoming Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Our Place in the Universe, which will be launched in June 2018. Learn more about the MOOC here. More details will be announced on Facebook.

HKU Online Learning - Courses and tools
A showcase of our online courses and the Video Vox Platform

EdTech Tools Showcase
Experience instant online polling with Mentimeter

Student Initiative

eLearning services provided by ITS

imseCAVE visit

Thank you once again for joining us in this joyous occasion. Check out our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for more photos!

Contact us if you are interested in using edtech tools in your classroom!

We hope to see you all again in our upcoming events! The next one will be the Authentic Assessment Symposium on May 3!

This blog post is part of the ‘Flipped Classroom Professional Development Series’.

There are multiple ways to assess the effectiveness of your flipped class. While there is no single perfect way to measure teaching effectiveness, practitioners from HKU have come up with a few useful methods and tips for evaluation, which they shared in the Flipped Classroom Learning Symposium – Sharing of Pedagogies and Practices. In general, adopting a mixed approach allows you to evaluate your class more comprehensively.

How Researchers Measured Effectiveness in the Literature

  1. Criteria of evaluation
    Effectiveness of the flipped classroom has been measured by multiple ways in the literature, most palpably by examining the course’s direct and indirect educational outcomes. A scoping review conducted by O’Flaherty and Phillips (2015) summarized how educators evaluated the effectiveness of a flipped class by measuring various direct and indirect educational outcomes.

    While different researchers may have different definitions of “educational outcomes”, direct educational outcomes usually refer to (i) students’ scores and grades in traditional summative assessment and (ii) attendance. In particular, students’ performance in tests, exams, group work and group presentations are often used for evaluation in research (Cheng, Lee, Chang & Yang, 2017; Cotta, Shah, Almgren, Macías-Moriarity & Mody, 2016; Gilboy, Heinerichs & Pazzaglia, 2015). In contrast to direct outcomes, indirect educational outcomes include (i) students’ course experience; (ii) their attitudes, perceptions, and feelings towards the course; (iii) student engagement and learning behavior (measured by learning data); and (iv) student empowerment and development in the course, e.g., development of high order thinking skills, such as creativity, problem-solving and critical thinking skills, etc.

    According to O’Flaherty and Phillips (2015), limited research had been conducted on evaluating student learning outcomes in terms of their development of high order thinking skills; more researchers chose to evaluate (i) student satisfaction of the flipped class; (ii) student-teacher interactions; (iii) student engagement in using e-learning gadgets such as apps in mobile devices; and (iv) the opportunity for real-time and immediate feedback (Gilboy et al., 2015)

  2. Tools for data collection
    Apart from evaluating students’ performance in assignments and reports, various tools can be used to collect data. Examples include student evaluation surveys and interviews. Some researchers also supplement their findings with their own observations.

Strategies Used by Practitioners in HKU
In the Flipped Classroom Learning Symposium, practitioners from HKU shared with us how they evaluate the effectiveness of their flipped classes. In general, they tend to adopt a mixed approach in evaluating the effectiveness of flipped classes, i.e. analyzing both direct and indirect educational outcomes, instead of only using one instrument to evaluate a course. This allows them to evaluate their courses more comprehensively.

Criteria of evaluation
When evaluating the effectiveness of their courses, the practitioners usually collect the following types of information:

  1. Students’ grades: For example, Mr. Mathew Pryor, course instructor of CCHU9001 Designs on the Future, considered grades as strong evidence of students’ improvement.
  2. Students’ comments and perceptions on (i) quality of teaching (in terms of clarity of delivery, clarity of goals and standards, opportunities for skill development, etc.); and (ii) assessment design and workload.
  3. Students behaviour in face-to-face interactions and online

Methods of data collection
Students’ feedback can be obtained through formal and informal means.

  1. Formal feedback can be obtained through surveys and interviews.
    • In HKU, the Student Evaluation of Teaching and Learning (SETL) questionnaire is issued at the end of each course as an official way to evaluate course and instructor effectiveness. In Mr. Pryor’s case, SETL scores served as useful reference for his own performance. Both the quantitative scores (direct ratings by students) and the qualitative response (in the form of open-ended comments) provide vital information for him to improve his course. Using this questionnaire, he discovered that his student evaluations “go up by 10%” after flipping his class. The questionnaire provides concrete evidence that proves the effectiveness of the flipped class approach.
    • In 2014, Professor Rick Glofcheski collected students’ feedbacks on his Tort Law flipped class using a survey with TeLi’s support. The survey collected both quantitative and qualitative evidence of the effectiveness of his flipped classes. Below are some examples:
      Quantitative evidence:
      60% students found the classes “useful”, and 34% “very useful”.
      (Image credit: Professor Rick Glofcheski)

      Qualitative evidence (anonymous comments from students):

      • “It helps me better understand and remember the consideration factors of duty of care.”
      • “It also is an opportunity to discuss with other classmates and get ideas and inspirations from them.”
      • “The class also acts as a useful preparation for future legal practices as it encourages students to articulately express themselves in both oral and written forms.”
      • “Very useful, made me understand the problems better and engage in debate with other students.”
    • Dr. Ng Ming Yen from the Department of Diagnostic Radiology also collected feedback from students in his tutorials on chest pain imaging using a questionnaire. It was part of an experiment he conducted in 2016-2017 to examine the effectiveness of the flipped class approach. 60 students first attended lectures and completed a questionnaire. They then attended flipped classes 6 months later and filled in the questionnaires again. The result showed that the students generally appreciated the videos and over 75% of them thought that the flipped class was an improvement.
       
      Apart from quantitative data, Dr. Ng also collected qualitative comments from students. For example, some students asked for more cases and more time for discussion. These comments provide references for improvement in the next cohort.
  2. Informal feedback can be quickly obtained by teachers in class and online. For example, a quick show of hands gives teachers a rough impression of whether students enjoy an activity. Teachers can also invite students to give anonymous feedback using discussion forums or online polling tools, such as Mentimeter.

    In Mr. Pryor’s case, he highly valued and respected students’ feedback. To understand how students perceive his teaching, he collected informal feedback by asking simple, straight-forward questions such as “Which activity do you like or not like?” or even “Are you happy?” on discussion forums or with Mentimeter. These immediate feedback from students are pivotal in course planning and strategizing.

  3. Observation of students’ behaviour in face-to-face interactions: It is also important for teachers to observe students’ response and behaviour in class, as their body language honestly reflects their extent of engagement and satisfaction. They provide alternative evidence to support findings generated in formal surveys. For example, For example, Dr. Courtney Fung evaluated the effectiveness of her teaching by observing students’ behaviour and response. In class, students assume roles of different nations and simulate real-world political negotiations to resolve crises. Since this activity was student-led, Dr. Fung acted as a facilitator and an observer during the process of negotiation. She observed that not only students were engaged in class, they even self-initiated further discussions over lunch after class. The level of engagement was high, which in turn reflected the effectiveness of the class.

    Dr. Courtney Fung

To sum up, it is best to evaluate a course from multiple dimensions, as different scales of measurement shed light on different aspects of a course. Direct and indirect educational outcomes, as well as students’ feedback, engagement and learning behavior, all have different advantages in telling how effective a flipped class is based on the nature of the course. Aligning your expected students’ learning outcomes with appropriate ways of measurement is crucial for effective evaluation.

Building a flipped class is a long process of development. From preparing online and pre-class elements, encouraging student participation, designing in-class activities, to evaluating  effectiveness, a lot of support and resources may be needed. It is our mission to support teachers in developing e-learning materials and flipping their classes. Contact us if you need help!

Next step
If you are interested in further exploring teaching and learning with us, don’t miss the Authentic Assessment Symposium: The Transformation of Learning in Higher Education on May 3!

This blog post is part of the Flipped Classroom Professional Development Series. More articles from the series:

References
Cheng, X., Lee, K. H., Chang, E. Y., & Yang, X. (2017). The “flipped classroom” approach: Stimulating positive learning attitudes and improving mastery of histology among medical students. Anatomical Sciences Education, 10(4), 317-327. Retrieved from https://search-proquest-com.eproxy1.lib.hku.hk/docview/1969022918?accountid=14548

Cotta, K. I., Shah, S., Almgren, M. M., Macías-Moriarity, L. Z., & Mody, V. (2016). Effectiveness of flipped classroom instructional model in teaching pharmaceutical calculations. Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning,8(5), 646-653.

Gilboy, M. B., Heinerichs,S., & Pazzaglia, G. (2015). Enhancing student engagement using the flipped classroom. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior,47(1), 109-114.

O’Flaherty, J. & Phillips, C. (2015). The use of flipped classrooms in higher education: A scoping review. Internet and Higher Education, 25(8), 85-95. Doi: 10.1016/j.iheduc.2015.02.002.

The University of Hong Kong (2018). Educational aims and institutional learning outcomes. In Undergraduate Handbook. Retrieved from http://www.handbook.hku.hk/ug/full-time-2017-18/important-policies/educational-aims-and-institutional-learning-outcomes

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