Teaching and Learning at The University of Hong Kong HKU

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The University of Hong Kong (HKU) aims to transform traditional on-campus education, removing the learning barriers of location and access. Besides providing the highest-quality MOOC learning experience, we also aim to launch outreach programmes to secondary schools to nurture future generations to engage in an active and self-directed lifelong learning. Starting from 2016, we have partnered with HKFYG Lee Shau Kee College (HLC) to organize a MOOC K12 learning campaign.

Empowering Secondary School Students through MOOCs

This project aims to address the needs of i) enriching students’ multicultural exposure, and ii) equipping students with generic skills and attitudes at secondary schools (K7-K12) in Hong Kong.

Generic skills (e.g. critical thinking, communications, creativity) and attitudes (e.g. global citizenship, lifelong learning, self-directed learning) are not nice-to-have value-adds but in huge demand today. There are needs of helping students to develop these skills and attitudes in an integrative and experiential manner, and to become a self-directed and global-minded young thinker for future study and work. Although extracurricular activities and liberal studies can facilitate students learning generic skills and attitudes, we believe there are limited opportunities in local secondary schools in Hong Kong for students to enrich further.

Unlike a university curriculum, local secondary schools usually has a standardized secondary education examination curriculum (HKDSE). In this standardized curriculum, it is difficult for students to find their interested courses such as taking a cutting-edge STEM subject or doing a self-initiated humanitarian project as these are often not available at local schools. Furthermore, for classes comprised of students with diverse learning needs, teacher’s support may be scarce and not timely. Therefore, students may not be fully aware or well informed about possible future learning opportunities or careers that can be pursued.

With this MOOC-based virtual exchange, we hope to provide a learning opportunity that is the most international available anywhere in the secondary school community. The project aims to achieve the following outcomes:

  • Facilitate students to gain exceptional learning experiences based on their own interests and outside their standardized curriculum;
  • Facilitate students to develop generic skills and attitude for nurturing globally-minded young thinkers.

MOOC Mentorship Programme has started since 2016. Students can have free access to quality education through MOOCs, which traditionally the courses can only be accessed by attending foreign institutions. One-to-one teacher-student mentoring is provided with continuous supervision and support throughout the academic year. The University provides MOOC learning workshops to students, and mentor training for teachers. Two MOOC Symposia have also been organized for recognizing students’ MOOC learning achievement.

Starting from 2019, MOOC Scholar Scheme will be introduced to students. This Scheme provides curriculum acceleration measures in the form of grade-skipping as successful applicants will be promoted from S.1 to S.3 or from S.2 to S.4. For students who have attained excellent academic performance on both their schoolwork and MOOC learning as well as showing discipline and maturity in their characters, they can then apply this Scheme. The project team has reviewed the guidelines listed in Reference Manual for Implementing Gifted Education in School: Acceleration Programmes published by Education Bureau, and has found that no similar initiative has been experimented in Hong Kong before.. This MOOC project provides an alternative to students who are capable of performing at one or more levels beyond the current level and fulfilling the aforementioned criteria. They would most benefit from grade-skipping. Participation in the Scheme is entirely voluntary.

Courtesy:"HKFYGCourtesy: HKFYG Lee Shau Kee College

Cultivating Young Thinkers through Self-Regulated Learning

The project adopts a number of pedagogies to enrich learning:

  1. Teacher-student mentoring – Mentors encourage and advise students in the early learning stage, such as helping students to believe that they have the ability to complete MOOCs. These mentoring help to build students’ self-efficacy, and they can then take on more challenges in MOOC learning (e.g. taking more demanding MOOCs)) and persist a longer MOOC learning journey.
  2. Self-directed/Self-regulated learning – Students can learn how to plan and control their learning process (content and pace of learning). They have to set goals, organize and self-evaluate their knowledge growth, which help to develop their high metacognitive skills. Prompt feedback through machine-graded assessments in MOOCs helps to guide students towards what they can do to improve and learn. Students can also attempt the questions several times until they master the concept, which is favourable to students who are less proficient in English.
  3. Inquiry-based learning – The diversified scope and flexible schedule of MOOCs allow students to choose their own interested courses and have a different learning experience other than their standardized secondary school education. This helps to develop their own interests, nurture their curiosity, and regulate their attention and memory acquisition. MOOCs also provide students with opportunities to solve complex problems in a different context, which is an authentic approach to deeper learning.
  4. Peer learning – Students can interact with learners all around the world in forum discussions. Through exchanging ideas with their peers (who are often professionals in the field) in the forum, students can construct their knowledge together and evaluate their prior knowledge to develop their critical thinking skills.

Significant Engagement among Students and Communities

Around 410 students have voluntarily participated in the MOOC Initiative starting from 2015, including 280 junior form students (S.1 to S.3) and 130 senior form students (S.4 to S.6, who need to take a public examination at S.6) joining. As English is used as the medium of instruction in the school, students generally have a higher English proficiency. Furthermore, according to the school’s admission record in 2018, most of the students are considered as Band 1 to 2 (top 33% to top 66%) students. In the pilot stage, we only allowed students with good academic performance to participate in the Initiative through teacher’s nomination. Later on, we have also allowed all S1 and S2 students to join the campaign through self-nomination. Furthermore, among the junior students, three of them are qualified to join the MOOC Scholar Scheme, and one S.2 student has decided to join the Scholar program. He will be promoted from S. 2 to S.4 in the 2019-2020 academic year.

Since the Project is still in its early stage, we have implemented this MOOC learning project in one secondary school only. However, the project team has also discussed with different parties, explaining the impact and mechanism of the Initiative for possible collaboration and project expansion:

  • The University of Bristol on educational research
  • The Hong Kong Polytechnic University on mentor training
  • Hong Kong SAR Education Bureau on educational policy and regulations
  • Hong Kong Association of the Heads of Secondary Schools on self-directed learning advocacy
  • Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups (The largest youth service organisation in Hong Kong) on self-directed learning advocacy

Leon Lei

Life-changing Experience through MOOC Learning

Until June 2019, over 40 students have completed more than 130 MOOCs produced by world-renowned institutes, such as MIT, Stanford University and Johns Hopkins University, etc. We have conducted pre- and post-mentorship surveys to collect feedback from students. Results indicated that 77.5% of (31 out of 40) students agreed or strongly agreed that the advocacy and training support they received have provided a positive impact on their participation in MOOCs. Meanwhile, 52% (14 out of 27) of students would like to join the mentorship programme next year. Furthermore, there are more junior students and their parents interested in the project and have asked for more details.

93% (26 out of 27) of the survey respondents agreed that MOOCs have a positive impact on their studies. We have also interviewed some of the participating students, and students were satisfied with the Initiative. In particular, the stories of two outstanding learners are shown as follows:

  • Kitty is a MOOC enthusiast who has completed over 20 MOOCs in 2 years’ time. In particular, her experience in taking a MOOC about Japan offered by one of the most famous universities in Japan, Wasada University, has given her advantage in interviews. It was beyond the imagination of the interviewers that a high school student can complete all these MOOCs in two years’ time. As a result of her participation in this project and her MOOC performance, she has been selected to participate in a competitive exchange programme to Japan.
  • Crystal is also a MOOC enthusiast who has completed over 30 MOOCs in 3 years’ time. She shared that her participation in these MOOCs has enriched her resume and given her the advantage in various university admission interviews. The outcome of her MOOC active participation is receiving a conditional offer of studying Engineering at The University of Hong Kong. She also pointed out that the MOOC certificate issued by MIT is highly recognized in the field, and added that one of her MOOC peer learners has landed a job because of the certificate. She also shared about the aspiration she drew from some of the professionals she met in the MIT MOOC alumni meeting. She believed that the MOOC she took has broaden her horizons and inspired her to continue to learn more from other MOOCs. After consolidating our survey findings and students’ sharing, we believe that both students and parents are interested in experimenting with our MOOC learning project.

With the aim of nurturing students as lifelong learners in mind, HKU would like to continue bringing the MOOC learning experience to communities. If your institution or school is interested to partner with us to launch a MOOC high school learning campaign, please feel free to contact us.

Written by

  • Dr. Leon Lei, Technology-Enriched Learning Initiative, The University of Hong Kong
  • Mr. Tony Wei, HKFYG Lee Shau Kee College
  • Ms. Sharon Keung, Technology-Enriched Learning Initiative, The University of Hong Kong

Further Reading

Some say online teaching is nothing more than putting lecture videos and assignments online, but Ms Charlotte Chang, e-Teacher-in-Residence at TELI and founder of Ms Charlotte Academy, sees it differently. In a presentation entitled “A Teacher’s Journey into Online Education: Taking the Leap, Reflecting in the Process, and Reaping the Rewards”, Charlotte reflected that her journey started when she noticed the inefficiencies of traditional classroom teaching and realized that, with online education, she could enjoy quality interaction with students while “distilling” her lessons and curriculum and presenting only the most ideal parts.

Taking the Leap

Charlotte pointed out that the adaptation of curriculum teaching into online materials was not simply a process of repackaging, but rather a comprehensive upgrade of the whole teaching package. As such, adaptability and suitability were her key considerations when she was creating her online teaching content: for example, how could she structure, time, and sequence the lecture videos in order to aid student understanding the most?

After transitioning to online teaching, she gained a wider student reach, but that didn’t mean that she has to repeat her core teaching content again and again; instead, she let students study the videos and materials at their own pace, thereby saving a lot of her teaching time and allowing her to keep the teaching content and student learning experience fresh and updated all the time.

Charlotte""Ms Charlotte Chang shared her insights about online teaching.

Reflecting in the Process

Charlotte summarized her journey of creating online lectures and teaching materials in 6 steps:

  1. conceptualizing the structure and flow of the lessons,
  2. writing the video script,
  3. adapting lessons into video scripts,
  4. storyboarding,
  5. filming, and
  6. post-production of the filmed lessons.

She highlighted that her lesson contents were not the only parts of the course enhanced through the use of multimedia; rather, the whole production process allowed her to explore alternative ways for content delivery and presented chances for her to keep refining and improving her pedagogical approach and her curriculum.

Although she found it challenging to transition from interpersonal and interactive classroom delivery to on-camera presentation, she emphasized that the advantage of producing video lectures was that teachers could capture their best contents and show students only their best teaching moments.

Reaping the Rewards

After stepping out of the traditional classroom setting, Charlotte found that students who adapted to online learning were more proactive in asking questions and reaching out to her for feedback and advice. Furthermore, she shared some examples with the audience and reassured them that online teaching indeed offers teachers higher-quality and more intimate interactions with students and contributes to a more fruitful teaching and learning outcome for both teachers and students alike.

Ricky""Professor Ricky Kwok, Associate Vice-President (Teaching and Learning) of HKU, responded to questions from the audience.

Food for thought

Towards the end of the lecture, audience members raised some questions for further discussion:

  • Why do we need to and how do we educate or persuade teachers to pursue e-teaching?
  • How can we consider whether a particular course would be compatible with the online course format of structured videos?

The full lecture video is as below:

If you need more advice on structuring and planning your online course content, don’t hesitate to contact us!

Promoting and Enabling Technology-Enriched Learning: Challenges and StrategiesThis is an event organized by Technology-Enriched Learning Initiative (TELI).

Details of the event:

Date : 30 May, 2018 (Thursday)
Time : 3:00pm – 4:30pm
Venue : CPD-LG.59, Centennial Campus, The University of Hong Kong
Speaker : Ms Charlotte Chang, e-Teacher-in-Residence, The University of Hong Kong
Respondent : Professor Ricky Kwok, Associate Vice-President (Teaching and Learning), The University of Hong Kong

Registration

Abstract
To teachers who are used to the setting and dynamics of a classroom, getting started in online education might seem daunting. After all, creating online courses involves adapting and rewriting course content, reenacting lessons on camera, and reorganizing class structures to enable student interactions in a completely different context—or, in other words, nothing short of overhauling traditional modes of teaching in large part. All this effort, however, is not only manageable with the right support, but also immensely rewarding for any teacher—practically, pedagogically, and intellectually.

In this seminar, Charlotte Chang, TELI’s e-Teacher-in-Residence, will use her own journey into online education as a starting point to reflect on the obvious and not-so-obvious (often even counter-intuitive) opportunities that await teachers who undertake a similar endeavor.

In the first part of the talk, “Taking the Leap”, Charlotte will reflect on the intellectual impulses and practical considerations that led her to create an online course. What ultimately convinced her that this daunting task would be worthwhile?

In the second part, “Reflecting in the Process”, Charlotte will share insights on the many opportunities for professional and intellectual growth that she found, often unexpectedly, throughout the course creation process. In optimizing and refining content and pedagogy for the course, she was motivated to strive for nothing less than the “best of her teaching”. An online course, ultimately, should not just be a repackaging of existing courses in a virtual format; rather, it is an opportunity for the educator to enhance and enrich existing curricula, teaching materials, pedagogical approaches, and student engagement.

In the final part of the talk, “Reaping the Rewards”, Charlotte will elaborate on the benefits of online education that classroom teaching cannot offer. Apart from practical rewards like eliminating the time spent on repeating core content, online education offers many less obvious, perhaps even counter-intuitive benefits to teaching and learning, such as deepening interactions with students with a wide range of learning styles and abilities.

Charlotte’s reflections on her journey as an online teacher should resonate with fellow educators from diverse academic fields who wish to embark on their own explorations of online education and the immense opportunities that it promises.

About the Speaker
Charlotte Chang, TELI’s “e-Teacher-in-Residence” in 2018-19, founded the online English education platform Ms. Charlotte Academy in 2017. After a year of writing a curriculum, developing materials, and filming and editing lessons, Charlotte launched her online course “Core Concepts of English” in late 2018. In the course, which currently enrolls over 200 students, Charlotte uses an analytical framework based in linguistics concepts to teach Hong Kong adults the unchanging rules of English syntax, introducing students to a systematic, structure-based approach to understanding how English works and how it differs from Cantonese/Chinese.

Charlotte’s core belief as a language teacher is that every student with basic analytical skills can gain a “big picture” perspective of how any language works, even if it is as different to their native language as English is to Chinese. Online education, which enables students to absorb and internalize new knowledge at their own pace, is a fitting format that facilitates this type of analytical teaching and learning.

Prior to her career in online education, Charlotte graduated from Harvard University in 2012 and worked as a secondary school teacher from 2012 to 2014. From 2014 to 2017, she experimented with and refined her linguistics-based approach to teaching English before finally writing her own curriculum. Her transformation from “traditional” to “online” teacher gave her much insight into the many benefits that technology can offer education, both in facilitating teaching and enhancing learning.

Registration

Enquiries should be directed to enquiry@teli.hku.hk.

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Be flexible, be innovative, and you will discover numerous ways to engage students with technology. HKU TELI and the Knowledge & Education Exchange Platform (KEEP) of the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) jointly organized a seminar to share examples of effective teaching strategies, namely flipped classroom, mobile apps, visualization tools and gamification.

KEEP: Flexibility and Visualization

Eddy""Mr. Eddy Yet, Project Coordinator of KEEP, presents on CUHK’s innovative practices in online teaching.

Mr. Eddy Yet, KEEP’s Project Coordinator, advises teachers to be flexible in teaching and visualizing students’ responses for effective knowledge exchange:

  1. Flexibility: To maximize the potential of flipped classroom, course teachers can adopt various e-learning tools to cater to students of different levels. For example, the instructor of a General Education Course, In Dialogue with Nature, presented the course content in the form of (i) Core Videos (which all students need to watch) and (ii) optional Online Supplementary Materials (for high achievers and those who are interested in further exploring the topic). This method of differentiated instruction allows flexibility in learning. The course team also developed a “Reading Companion” mobile app, which helps students evaluate their own learning from time to time with knowledge checks and a mini-dictionary.
  2. KEEP“Reading Companion” mobile app of a CUHK General Education course (In Dialogue with Nature). [Image credit to KEEP]

  3. Visualization: Often, a popular discussion thread in an online course contains over a thousand elaborated written responses. These responses are not effective if students do not read all of them. One solution is to introduce visualization tools, such as Sharing Board, where students illustrate their ideas with mind maps instead of words, or present data in word clouds. The KEEP team has witnessed successful examples of visualizing the course content and believes that this is an effective way to “summarize the learning content, and make good use of students’ input”.

TELI: Gamifying In-class Activities

Ricky""Professor Ricky Kwok, Associate Vice-President (Teaching and Learning) of HKU, introduces the course design of his Common Core course (Everyday Computing and the Internet).

Professor Ricky Kwok, Associate Vice-President (Teaching and Learning) of HKU, strives to spend quality time with students during class. Hence, he worked with TELI and designed a board game as an in-class activity of his Common Core course, Everyday Computing and the Internet.

boardProfessor Ricky Kwok (Middle) guides students to play the board game in his class.

The board game’s design is similar to that of poker, but is integrated with the course’s core concepts. To win the game, students need to first develop a good understanding of the course content by watching online explainer videos produced by the course team. The wish to win motivates students to actively participate in the board game, and therefore take greater ownership of their learning.

Having moved the lectures online, Professor Kwok can give more quality time to each student in class to support his/her learning. He jokes that when students are competing in the board game, he becomes a “server”, walking around the classroom and answering students’ questions about the game as well as the course content by asking them, “How can I help you, Sir?” Professor Kwok found that students, in such a way, are more vocal in asking questions, increasing his interaction with students.

At the end of the seminar, Professor Kwok summarizes three success criteria for gamification in education:

  1. Is the game interesting and goal-orientated?
  2. Does the game have a good pace? Do players have to spend much time to make one move?
  3. Is the game connected to the course content?

It is always possible for educators, not just from HKU, but also from the other institutions, to digitalize, visualize, or even gamify their course content. Interested in bringing these ideas into your classroom? Don’t hesitate to contact us!

Watch the full recording of 2019 TELI X KEEP Seminar:

Further Reading

  1. Learning through gamification
  2. Not just for fun: Gamify your class
  3. KEEPing up with learning through gamification

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Organised by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Details of the workshop:

Date : 21 March, 2019 (Thursday)
Time : 1:00pm – 2:00pm
Venue : Room 321, 3/F, Run Run Shaw Building (Main Campus), HKU
Speaker : Dr. Cecilia Ka Yuk Chan, Head of Professional Development and Associate Professor, Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Abstract

Students’ perspectives on Feedback.


About the Speaker

Kwan Yuen-Ying, Connie
Connie Kwan is a student on the BEd/BSc double degree and a member of the editorial team for the International Journal for Students as Partners.

Kwok Kai-Yin, Jonathan
Jonathan Kwok is a student on the BEd/BSc double degree and is researching feedback practices in the Faculty of Engineering.

Tanya Kempston
Tanya Kempston is a lecturer in the Faculty of Education and a winner of a University Outstanding Teaching Award in 2018.

David Carless
David Carless specializes in feedback research and practice, and was a winner of a University Outstanding Teaching Award in 2016.

Registration

For information, please contact:
Mr. Thomas Lau , CETL
Phone: 3917 4807; Email: kanclau@hku.hk​

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Organised by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Details of the workshop:

Date : 26 March 2019 (Tuesday)
Time : 12:45pm – 2:00pm
Venue : CPD 2.75, Chi Wah Learning Commons, Centennial Campus
Speaker : Prof. Gina Marchetti, Ms. Tanya Kempston, Mr. Nikolas Ettel
Facilitator : Dr. Tracy Zou (CETL), Dr. Michelle Raquel (CAES), and Mr. Simon Boynton (CAES)
Organiser : Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning, Centre for Applied English Studies, and the Common Core

Abstract

At HKU, we are committed to recognising and developing a number of Communication-intensive (CI) courses that explicitly develop students’ communication knowledge, skills, and attributes. Through the process of working with interested colleagues across HKU, we have found that film and drama can be used as powerful learning tools to create opportunities for students across various disciplines to acquire communication literacies in interactive and analytical settings. To many students, film and drama are fun, motivating, and engaging. In this join-the-conversation event, we are pleased to welcome three course leaders to share with us how their courses develop students’ communication literacies through film and drama. More information about the CI courses can be found here:
https://cics.hku.hk/


About the Speaker

Gina Marchetti teaches courses in film, gender and sexuality, critical theory and cultural studies at the University of Hong Kong. She is the author of Romance and the “Yellow Peril”: Race, Sex and Discursive Strategies in Hollywood Fiction (Berkeley: University of California, 1993), From Tian’anmen to Times Square: Transnational China and the Chinese Diaspora on Global Screens (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2006), and The Chinese Diaspora on American Screens: Race, Sex, and Cinema (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2012), Andrew Lau and Alan Mak’s INFERNAL AFFAIRS—The Trilogy (Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2007), and Citing China: Politics, Postmodernism, and World Cinema (Hawai’i, 2018), among other publications. Her most recent book is The Palgrave Handbook of Asian Cinema, co-edited with Aaron Han Joon Magnan-Park and See Kam Tan (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2018). Visit the website https://hkwomenfilmmakers.wordpress.com/for more information about her work on Hong Kong women filmmakers since 1997. To register for her Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Hong Kong cinema, go to https://www.edx.org/course/hong-kong-cinema-through-global-lens-hkux-hku06-1x.

Tanya Kempston a lecturer in Faculty of Education at the University of Hong Kong, where she teaches in the areas of second language learning in secondary settings, using drama and literary texts in a variety of educational contexts. Before coming to HKU, she was a Curriculum Development Officer in the Hong Kong Education and Manpower NET Section. She is a keen advocate of the use of drama as a medium for enhancing students’ creative, collaborative and communicative skills and abilities, having experienced at first hand the enjoyment and satisfaction students gain from making and appreciating drama on her Common Core course. As part of this course, students work in groups to create their own performance pieces for a real audience of secondary school students, making effective communication essential in the devising and performance stages! Tanya is one of the winners of the HKU Outstanding Teaching Award 2018.

Nikolas Ettel is a lecturer in the Department of Architecture at the University of Hong Kong. Born in Vienna, he holds a Bachelor of Architecture from the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna. In London he received The Bartlett Master’s Scholarship to complete his Master of Arts in Architectural History at The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL. Nikolas has taught design and architectural theory courses in Hong Kong, Shanghai and Tokyo, and was a Visiting Lecturer at University of Saint Joseph Macau. His elective course Architecture & Memory takes a closer look at the art of motion pictures, in which students explore the productive interplay between cinematic productions and architectural discourses. The aim is to focus attention on works of quality in order to create new grounds for architectural discussions while enhancing our understanding of existing ones.

Registration

For information, please contact:
Mr. Thomas Lau , CETL
Phone: 3917 4807; Email: kanclau@hku.hk​

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Organised by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Details of the workshop:

Date : 20 March, 2019 (Wednesday)
Time : 12:00nn – 1:00pm
Venue : Room 321, 3/F, Run Run Shaw Building (Main Campus), HKU
Speaker : Dr. Jessica R. Valdez, Assistant Professor, School of English, HKU
Facilitator : Dr. Luke Fryer, Associate Professor, CETL, HKU

Abstract
Many humanities scholars are discussing methods to internationalize, globalize, and decolonize the classroom. This TEF explored ways to link up classrooms at the University of Hong Kong and the University of Manchester in ways that would encourage international collaboration and decolonize the Victorian literature curriculum. This talk will present our plans to interlink the course, “Global Victorians,” at both HKU and UoM in Spring 2020. Students will work together to analyze nineteenth-century objects at museums in their respective cities, and they will also work on collaborative online annotations of poetry using technology made possible by COVE, The Central Online Victorian Educator, a scholar-driven open-access platform for peer-reviewed Victorian material related to teaching. As part of this collaboration, Dr. Clara Dawson, lecturer at the University of Manchester, visited the School of English in Fall 2018 to collaborate with Dr. Jessica R. Valdez and other staff members.

About the Speaker
Jessica R. Valdez is an assistant professor of English at the University of Hong Kong. Her research interests include nineteenth-century British literature and culture, the novel, and literary theory. Her current book project is tentatively titled, Plotting the News: Nation and Newspaper in the Victorian Novel, and she is also working on an article on late-Victorian serialized dystopian novels for a special issue of Journal of Modern Periodical Studies. Her writing has appeared in Studies in the Novel and Victorian Periodicals Review. She received her Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University.

Registration

For information, please contact:
Mr. Thomas Lau, CETL
Phone: 3917 4807; Email: kanclau@hku.hk​

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Organised by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Details of the workshop:

Date : 6 March, 2019 (Wednesday)
Time : 12:00nn – 1:00pm
Venue : Room 321, 3/F, Run Run Shaw Building (Main Campus), HKU
Speaker : Prof. Maggy Lee, Professor, Department of Sociology, HKU
Facilitator : Dr. Luke Fryer, Associate Professor, CETL, HKU

Abstract
Many world-leading universities have developed innovative strategies to promote excellence in both education and research and to embed research knowledge and the pursuit of a research mindset and skills in the curriculum. The speaker spent over a month as a Teaching Exchange Fellow at the University of Essex, one of the dual intensive universities in the UK which has also won the University of the Year at the Times Higher Education Awards 2018. Drawing on her discussions with staff, community partners and students especially in social sciences and in-class observations, the speaker will share her experience and insights gained from the Fellowship. How does the research-based education strategy work at Essex? Does it work? The speaker will draw on two specific examples for illustration – ‘Essex Challenge’ which encouraged students and local community partners to tackle some of the pressing socio-economic issues in the city, and the THINK seminar series which won the Guardian University Award for Student Experience.

About the Speaker
Professor Maggy Lee teaches sociology and criminology and has played a leading role in the review and development of UG and TPG curriculum and experiential learning in the Department of Sociology at The University of Hong Kong. She has served as the Coordinator of the Bachelor of Criminal Justice degree programme and the Convenor of the Teaching and Curriculum Committee in the department, and as an Internal Panel Member on a number of degree programmes at HKU and an External Panel Member for the Hong Kong Council for Accreditation of Academic and Vocational Qualifications and the HK Research Grants Council. One of her current community-based research and public education projects looks at the experiences of ethnic minorities in Hong Kong through music-making and walking tours.

Registration

For information, please contact:
Mr. Thomas Lau, CETL
Phone: 3917 4807; Email: kanclau@hku.hk​

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Organised by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Abstract

Feedback is one of the biggest challenges in teaching and learning that currently many universities are facing around the world. In order to get more familiar with this global challenge, CETL is conducting a series of workshops from the 13th Feb. We are very honored to have Prof. David Carless from the Faculty of Education, a renowned expert in this area to share with us his insights on feedback and feedforward. In addition, our first group of Teaching Feedback Award (TFA) winners will be sharing with us their excellent practices in feedback.

Registration


Workshop 1: Do we know what feedback is?

Date : 13 February (Wednesday) 2019
Time : 1:00pm – 2:00pm
Venue : RR321, Run Run Shaw Building, Main Campus
Speaker : Dr. Cecilia Ka Yuk Chan, Head of Professional Development and Associate Professor, Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

In this workshop, Dr. Chan will generate conversation on feedback, go in depth with the participants the ideas, challenges and controversies of what feedback can do.

About the Speaker
Dr. Cecilia Chan is the Head of Professional Development and Associate Professor in the Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning at the University of Hong Kong. She has conducted research on topics such as the development and assessment of generic competencies, assessment, feedback and engineering, science and business education. Cecilia holds a PhD in Engineering from Trinity College, a postgraduate diploma and a MA in Higher Education. She also held a Fellowship from King’s College London. Dr. Chan has involved in over 40 research projects worldwide and was awarded the HKU Outstanding Researcher Award in 2014. She is the Chair for the Engineering Education Community in Hong Kong and will be the Founding President for the ASIA Society Engineering Education (ASIASee). Dr. Chan is a seasonal keynote and invited speakers for many conferences internationally, she has also chaired a number of international conferences. More information can be found in the Teaching and Learning Enhancement and Research Group (TLERG) website: http://tlerg.cetl.hku.hk/


Workshop 2: Teaching Feedback Award (TFA) Winners – Sharing Excellent Feedback Practices

Date : 19 February (Tuesday) 2019
Time : 1:00pm – 2:00pm
Venue : RR321, Run Run Shaw Building, Main Campus
Speaker : Ms. Alice Lee, Associate Professor and Associate Dean (Academic Affairs), Faculty of Law
Dr Kam Pui Wat, FSA, CERA, FRM, Lecturer, Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science

About the Speaker
Alice Lee
Alice Lee is an Associate Professor and Associate Dean (Academic Affairs) of the Faculty of Law, a member of the University Teaching and Learning Quality Committee and other teaching-related committees, and chairman of the HKU Teaching Exchange Fellowship Sub-group as well as the Law Faculty Outstanding Teaching Award panel. She specializes in real property and intellectual property (“IP”) education, and co-launched the IP Ambassador Programme with the HKSAR Intellectual Property Department for students to connect with the industry and reach out to the public. She has received two University-level teaching awards and a student-led Teaching Feedback Award, and has been practising and promoting the core values of the UK Higher Education Academy (“HEA”) since she became an HEA Senior Fellow in 2017.


Dr Kam Pui Wat
Dr Wat received his BSc(ActuarSc) and PhD in Actuarial Science from The University of Hong Kong. He is a Fellow of the Society of Actuaries, a Chartered Enterprise Risk Analyst and a certified Financial Risk Manager. He teaches courses mainly targeting Risk Management and Statistics students from the Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, aspiring to demonstrate to students the rigor and usefulness of quantitative analysis from theory to practice.

In an attempt to enhance academic progress and performance of students by providing valuable feedback, Dr. Wat tried to reach out to each student individually where possible, or students in small group meetings. Interaction and views exchange would be more feasible on these occasions and students generally feel more comfortable in raising their concerns in such an environment. In this way, effective response and helpful feedback can be given to individuals in order to address their specific needs.


Workshop 3: Teaching Feedback Award (TFA) Winners – Sharing Excellent Feedback Practices

Date : 26 February (Tuesday) 2019
Time : 1:00pm – 2:00pm
Venue : RR321, Run Run Shaw Building, Main Campus
Speaker : Professor Ian Thynne, Department of Politics and Public Administration
Dr. Cecilia Ka Yuk Chan, Head of Professional Development and Associate Professor, CETL

About the Speaker
Professor Ian Thynne
Visiting Professor; Adjunct Professor, Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University; Honorary Associate Fellow, Centre for Civil Society and Governance, University of Hong Kong.
Taught and researched public governance, policy, administration and management in New Zealand, Australia, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Singapore and Hong Kong.
Co-editor of the Asia Pacific Journal of Public Administration and Public Administration and Development.


Dr. Cecilia Chan
Dr. Cecilia Chan is the Head of Professional Development and Associate Professor in the Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning at the University of Hong Kong. She has conducted research on topics such as the development and assessment of generic competencies, assessment, feedback and engineering, science and business education. Cecilia holds a PhD in Engineering from Trinity College, a postgraduate diploma and a MA in Higher Education. She also held a Fellowship from King’s College London. Dr. Chan has involved in over 40 research projects worldwide and was awarded the HKU Outstanding Researcher Award in 2014. She is the Chair for the Engineering Education Community in Hong Kong and will be the Founding President for the ASIA Society Engineering Education (ASIASee). Dr. Chan is a seasonal keynote and invited speakers for many conferences internationally, she has also chaired a number of international conferences. More information can be found in the Teaching and Learning Enhancement and Research Group (TLERG) website: http://tlerg.cetl.hku.hk/


Workshop 4: Teaching Feedback Award (TFA) Winners – Sharing Excellent Feedback Practices

Date : 5 March (Tuesday) 2019
Time : 1:00pm – 2:00pm
Venue : RR321, Run Run Shaw Building, Main Campus
Speaker : Dr. Olivia Leung, Assistant Dean (Undergraduate), Faculty of Business and Economics
Dr. Prasanna Neelakantan, Clinical Assistant Professor of Endodontology, Faculty of Dentistry

About the Speaker
Dr. Prasanna Neelakantan
Dr. Prasanna Neelakantan is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Endodontology at the Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong. He also serves as the Assistant Dean for Research and Innovation in the Faculty. He graduated from India and also completed his specialty training in conservative dentistry and endodontics from India. He went on to complete a doctorate from ACTA, University of Amsterdam. With more than 90 scientific publications in high impact peer reviewed journals, Dr. Prasanna’s h-index now stands at 21. His papers have been cited about 1500 times. He has delivered more than 50 international invited/keynote lectures and mentors research groups in several parts of the world. He has also won highly reputed research awards from the International Association for Dental Research. He is very passionate about teaching and creating optimal learning environments for students to engage in active learning. With a very strong belief of “Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime”, he is committed to mentoring his students for lifelong learning and self-development. He has won teaching excellence awards in India as well as in Hong Kong, where he was one of the first recipients of the Teaching Feedback Award in 2018.


Workshop 5: The Feedback Expert

Date : 12 March (Tuesday) 2019
Time : 1:00pm – 2:00pm
Venue : RR321, Run Run Shaw Building, Main Campus
Speaker : Prof. David Carless, Faculty of Education

About the Speaker
Professor David Carless
Professor David Carless from the Faculty of Education is a specialist in feedback research and practice in higher education. His signature publication is the book Excellence in University Assessment: Learning from Award-winning Practice (2015, Routledge). His next book comes out in July 2019: Winstone, N. & Carless, D. (in press). Designing for student uptake of feedback in higher education (Routledge). His current research focuses on teacher and student feedback literacy to enhance the impact of feedback processes. He is a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. He was the winner of a University Outstanding Teaching Award in 2016. Further details of his work are on his website: https://davidcarless.edu.hku.hk/


For information, please contact:
Ms. Noranda Zhang , CETL
Phone: 3917 4729; Email: noranda@hku.hk​

Mr. Thomas Lau, CETL
Phone: 3917 4807; Email: kanclau@hku.hk​

Related Items 

TELI X KEEP: Enhancing Engagement in Teaching and Learning with Technology(This event is jointly organized by Technology-Enriched Learning Initiative, HKU and Knowledge and Education Exchange Platform, CUHK.)

Details of the event:

Date : 30 January, 2019 (Wednesday)
Time : 1:00pm – 2:30pm
Venue : CPD-LG.34, Centennial Campus, The University of Hong Kong
Speakers :

  • Mr Eddy Yet, Project Coordinator, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Professor Ricky Kwok, Associate Vice-President (Teaching and Learning), The University of Hong Kong

Abstract

New technologies have been changing the way we teach and learn. While we are presented with numerous innovative pedagogies and tools, there are common practices that can be adopted to enhance engagement and teaching effectiveness. In the first part of this seminar, the Knowledge and Education Exchange Platform (KEEP) will present local examples of flipped classroom, online supplementary modules and content visualization in higher education, and discuss why more teachers are adopting these practices.

The second part of the seminar will focus on HKU’s gamified flipped classroom practices. The University’s Technology-Enriched Learning Initiative (TELI) has been trying to bring students a new dimension of immersive learning. In this presentation, Professor Ricky Kwok will introduce good practices in gamification in the classroom, and present TELI’s work in this area to-date. The talk will address the challenges and strategies of balancing entertainment and education, driving competition in game-based learning to inspire achievement of learning outcomes, and creating a gaming space that brings learners closer.

About the Speakers

Mr. Eddy Yet, Project Coordinator
The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Working with teachers, instructional designers and developers among local universities, Mr. Eddy Yet, the Project Coordinator, participates in the development of the Knowledge and Education Exchange Platform (KEEP) to build a one-stop educational platform that facilitates teaching and learning.

Professor Ricky Kwok, Associate Vice-President (Teaching and Learning)
The University of Hong Kong

Professor Ricky Kwok assists the Vice-President and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Teaching and Learning) in HKU’s endeavors related to e-learning (e.g., MOOCs, SPOCs, blended learning, research, EdTech etc.). He leads the Technology-Enriched Learning Initiative (TELI) team, which consists of e-learning technologists, instructional designers, researchers in learning analytics, specialists in system development, and multimedia talents in developing e-learning solutions in HKU.

Registration

Enquiries should be directed to enquiry@teli.hku.hk.

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