Teaching and Learning at The University of Hong Kong HKU

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Organised by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Details of the workshop:

Date : 13 November , 2017 (Monday)
Time : 2:30pm – 3:30pm
Venue : Room 321, 3/F, Run Run Shaw Building (Main Campus), HKU
Speaker : Dr. Xiaoli Tian, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, HKU
Facilitator : Dr. Luke Fryer, Associate Professor, CETL, HKU

Abstract

Are you satisfied with the current means of evaluating students’ learning experiences (SETL)? Are there alternative ways to evaluate performance in education? To explore these questions, Professor D. Menchik from Michigan State University (MSU) is invited to visit Department of Sociology, The University of Hong Kong under the Teaching Exchange Fellowship Scheme. During his visit, Professor Menchik shared insights into good practices at the Michigan State University (MSU) in general, and an innovative program (a residential college program) that he is involved in at the MSU in particular. At MSU, outcomes based evaluation system is used to evaluate how much the students have learned from the teaching and learning experience. Instead of asking them how much they liked the teacher/course, this new way of evaluating focuses instead on the differences in the students before and after a particular course or program. Therefore, evaluation from this perspective is more objective because it is based on how much the students have actually learned from the course.

This seminar will also cover topics including a mentoring program for providing feedback on teaching; an incentive system for rewarding teachers who participate in teaching-related professional development; and a system that allows submission of evidence of innovative teaching in materials for annual staff evaluations or promotion reviews.

About the Speaker

Dr. Xiaoli Tian is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Hong Kong. She received her Ph.D. from Department of Sociology, The University of Chicago. Her research interests include how preexisting knowledge paradigms and cultural norms influence the way people respond to unexpected transformations of their everyday routines. This interest is reflected in her two main lines of research: medical knowledge as situated practices and social interaction. She has written extensively on various forms of online interactions, including emails, blogs, online literature websites in China, social media, etc. Her writings have been published in American Journal of Sociology; Modern China; Information, Communication and Society; Journal of Contemporary Ethnography; Media, Culture and Society; Studies in Media and Communications; Chinese Sociological Review, Symbolic Interaction, Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, among others.

Registration

For information, please contact:
Ms. Noranda Zhang , CETL
Phone: 3917 4729; Email: noranda@hku.hk​

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Organised by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Details of the workshop:

Date : 12 October , 2017 (Thursday)
Time : 12:30pm – 1:30pm
Venue : Room 321, 3/F, Run Run Shaw Building (Main Campus), HKU
Speaker : Dr Rachel Lui, Lecturer, Faculty of Science, HKU
Facilitator : Dr. Luke Fryer, Associate Professor, CETL, HKU

Abstract

The use of instructional videos for teaching has been becoming popular in recent years, and Camtasia can be a convenient software for such purpose. With her previous experience in using Camtasia, Dr. Lui would like to explore other tools that can offer different functionalities for making videos. With the support of Teaching Exchange Fellowship Scheme, she visited University of California, Los Angeles to investigate a new technology called Learning Glass, which can be used for recording lectures that allows instructors to write lecture notes while maintaining face-to-face contact with students. Unlike traditional classrooms where the instructor’s back is to the students while writing on a whiteboard, the Learning Glass allows for a more engaged, natural, relaxed, and interactive viewing experience. The instructor is recorded forward facing which allows for natural eye contact with the camera/students, gesturing and demonstrating what has been written on the glass. In this seminar, Dr. Lui would like to share her experience in using the Learning Glass to make 47 videos for a Science Foundation Course. She will highlight some of the special features about the Learning Glass and share some tips on how to make effective videos.​

About the Speaker
Dr. Lui currently works as a lecturer in the Faculty of Science. Over the past years, she has been actively involved in the teaching of Common Core courses and the Science Foundation courses. She does not think of herself as a gadget geek but she is enthusiastically engaged in e-learning technologies, such as developing a Calculus e-learning platform and a related app HKU Calculus with support from a TDG. She has been interviewed by TELI on DIY videos for flipping the classroom. Her next goal is to gamify learning. She, together with other colleagues, received the Award for Teaching Innovations in E-learning 2016-17 from the Faculty of Science as a recognition of her effort.

Registration

For information, please contact:
Ms. Noranda Zhang , CETL
Phone: 3917 4729; Email: noranda@hku.hk​

With the rerun of Hong Kong Cinema Through a Global Lens, the course team decided to bring the discussion of cinematic culture back into a cinema once again. Professor Gina Marchetti, Dr. Aaron Magnan-Park, Dr. Stacilee Ford and over 30 Hong Kong movie fanatics gathered at the Broadway Cinematheque in Yau Ma Tei on September 9, 2017 to “look at how Hong Kong is defined by world cinema and how it pushed back against those definitions.”

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Globalization is one of the most important messages that the course team wants to highlight throughout the 6-week course. Through examining Hong Kong movies, the course team would discuss the triangle relationship between Hong Kong, Hollywood and mainland China, and how Hong Kong movies are digested and defined in Europe, particularly through film festivals like Cannes or the Venice film festival. Learners can expect to learn not only about Hong Kong films, but “what global issues are involved in Hong Kong cinema.”

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Among the audience were some that had experienced the golden age of Hong Kong film industry. With vivid reminiscence of the good old times, one audience member wondered why Hong Kong movie productions of these days cannot seem to match the quality in the past. Professor Marchetti explained that over the years, the Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement (CEPA) has made it much easier for Hong Kong filmmakers, primarily producers and directors, to make films in mainland China. As a result, filmmakers found it “much more lucrative to make movies across the border.” However, Dr. Ford reminded the audience that “even if people are critiquing the film industry from an aesthetic standpoint or arguing that it has had to sell out to the mainland, as a historian these films continue to do really, really important work.”

bannerThe course team was joined by over 30 Hong Kong movie fanatics

Let’s see what the course team shared on each week of the MOOC:
Week 1: Jackie Chan
“Wonderful example of what Jackie Chan is known around the world for: spectacular stunts, timing, Martial Arts choreography…death defying…high wire [acts]. [They are] amazing and recognized around the world.”

Week 2: Bruce Lee and the Global Kung Fu Craze
“For so long, Bruce Lee was the only non-white superstar. People who are used to seeing Hollywood action stars always being white men, they could finally see someone that was like them, not white. Even with Caucasians, they saw in Bruce Lee something as an alternative to the dominant ideologies that we were getting about masculinity.”

Week 3: Melodramas of Migrations: Mabel Cheung Yuen Ting’s An Autumn’s Tale
“There is this proud tradition of women filmmakers telling…or building on their own stories in particular ways and it opens up the conversation of US history as well as global history…. The discussion of identity is not just about politics, it is about survival, it is about storytelling, it is about history.”

Week 4: John Woo’s Heroic Bloodshed Films: Hong Kong vs. Hollywood
“The triad films of John Woo emphasize this idea of friendship, especially this kind of an unexpected friendship because John Woo’s gangster triad assassin becomes best friends with a police inspector. Technically they’re on opposite sides of the law, they should never become friends, but they share a kind of a chivalric ethos that they recognize in each other and so they bond as friends that way. The argument I make is through these triad films we have the possibility of recreating Confucian virtue in Hong Kong society from the bottom moving up. As long as Confucian friendship remains, the Confucian virtuous project and social harmony still has a chance to happen in Hong Kong.”

Week 5: Hong Kong on Postmodern Screens: Infernal Affairs
“To just give you a little idea of something else that makes the MOOC unique is the fact that we had the opportunity to talk to many of the filmmakers who actually produce these films. I was lucky enough to speak with Andrew Lau about the making of the film.”

Week 6: Hong Kong Cinema as World Cinema: In the Mood for Love
“Now when we look at In The Mood For Love, in the film, I talk quite a lot about not simply the chemistry between Maggie Cheung and Tony Leung but also about the way in which it reveals a certain understanding of Hong Kong’s position in the world, not just in the 1960s when it is set, but also in the years following the handover.”

Sign up for the course here to learn more.

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Organised by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Details of the workshop:

Date : 26 October, 2017 (Thursday)
Time : 12:00nn – 1:00pm
Venue : Room 321, 3/F, Run Run Shaw Building (Main Campus), HKU
Chairman : Ms Alice Lee, Associate Professor, Department of Law, HKU
Facilitator : Dr. Luke Fryer, Associate Professor, CETL, HKU

Abstract

Grants for overseas reciprocal visits through ‘Teaching Exchange Fellowship Scheme’

To promote HKU staff to bring in new ideas and teaching methods to improve teaching through interaction with overseas university teachers, HKU will award up to $50,000 for reciprocal staff visits. This funding is provided through the “Teaching Exchange Fellowship Scheme”. The seminar provides an overview of this funding scheme and information on the application process. Staff will be guided on how to go about planning exchange visits to enhance the scholarship of teaching at HKU, which is the aim of the scheme. It will explain, and also showcase examples, on how this funding opportunity can be used by HKU teaching staff to share experience and to collaborate on teaching and curriculum development initiatives with overseas reputable universities through reciprocal visits.

The seminar is open to all teaching staff interested in finding out more about this Teaching Exchange Fellowship Scheme. Staff will be provided an overview of the scheme, how to lodge an application, the key objectives, amounts they can apply for, eligibility and advice in preparing an application. Staff who are thinking about applying are strongly encouraged to attend. Staff who attended the last seminar but found they had insufficient time to make overseas contacts, or who are thinking of planning ahead, in time for the next round (having a November 17th, 2017 closing date), would also find the seminar useful. If you are not sure whether this scheme would be relevant to teaching innovations you have in mind, or would simply like to know more about the scheme, you are welcome. The Circular on this scheme can be found at http://intraweb.hku.hk/reserved_2/cdqa/doc/TEFS/TEFS_2017-18.pdf.

Registration

For information, please contact:
Ms. Noranda Zhang , CETL
Phone: 3917 4729; Email: noranda@hku.hk​

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Organised by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Details of the workshop:

Date : 23 October, 2017 (Monday)
Time : 12:45 pm – 2:00 pm
Venue : Room 321, 3/F, Run Run Shaw Building (Main Campus)
Facilitator : Dr. Cecilia Chan, Head of Professional Development, Associate Professor, HKU
Speaker : Professor Abby Cathcart, Head of the QUT Academy of Learning and Teaching, QUT Business School, Australia

Abstract

The UK Higher Education Academy (HEA) is an independent, charitable organisation, which promotes teaching excellence in higher education. HEA manages a fellowship scheme underpinned by the Professional Standards Framework (PSF) to benchmark success within higher education teaching. There are more than 90,000 HEA fellows worldwide, including 1500 in Australia and New Zealand.

QUT is a recognised leader in teaching quality, with more Australian Awards for University Teaching than any other University in the sector over the past ten years. QUT became a Global Strategic Partner of the HEA in 2016 and since then more than 400 staff members have successfully been recognised as HEA Fellows. This short seminar presentation will share QUT’s strategy for building a community of fellows and reflect on the impact of professional recognition on individuals, schools and the wider community. It will also outline a new project, supported by Trade & Investment Queensland and the HEA, which provides opportunities for educators in Hong King and China to participate in knowledge exchange and research collaborations framed by the PSF, with award-winning Senior Fellows from Queensland Universities.

About the Speaker
abby_qut

Dr Abby Cathcart is a Professor of Work and Organisation in QUT Business School and the Head of the QUT Academy of Learning and Teaching. Professor Cathcart led the accreditation of a range of pathways to fellowship, benchmarked against the UK HEA’s Professional Standards Framework. With the support of her team, more than 400 QUT staff members have achieved professional recognition over the last two years. In 2014 Abby received QUT’s inaugural David Gardiner Teacher of the Year Medal.

Abby’s research encompasses two distinct areas. The first is on employee involvement and voice and includes articles on the John Lewis Partnership Model, flexible work arrangements, and democratic decision-making. Her second research focus area stems from the scholarship of teaching and incorporates research on assessment, feedback, student engagement and early career academic voice.

Abby is a Principal Fellow of the UK Higher Education Academy and an international accreditor for the UK Higher Education Academy. This role includes mentoring staff members and working with overseas institutions to design professional development programs and benchmark them against the Professional Standards Framework. Abby is the recipient of three national Australian Awards for University Teaching (Citation, Teaching Excellence Award, and Program Award). She co-designed and directs the Teaching Advantage Global Program for doctoral candidates and early career academics at QUT and beyond. This won the International Education Association of Australia’s Best Practice Award in 2015. She is a visiting fellow in the Centre for Higher Education Learning and Teaching at Australian National University.

Research Projects
Abby’s projects include:

  • Global Partnerships for Academic Teaching Excellence, leading a consortium of all Queensland Universities, funded by Trade and Investment Queensland, International Education and Training Partnerships Fund and the UK Higher Education Academy
  • International perspectives on the impact of professional recognition, with Smart (Edinburgh Napier), Floyd & Davies (Ulster) Carkett (Bath), Dransfield (York St John) & Davies (University College London)
  • Enhancing management students’ professional presentation skills through self and peer assessment: Calibrating judgment using the 3D presentation framework, with Grant-Smith & Williams, QUT, funded by the Australia & New Zealand Academy of Management. http://doctoralteaching.org/professional-presentations-toolkit/
  • Improving assessment and marking in Higher Education, with Neale (QUT), funded by QUT

Selected Recent Publications

  • Greer, D., Cathcart, A., and Neale, L. (2016). Helping doctoral students teach: Transitioning to early career academia through cognitive apprenticeship. Higher Education Research and Development. 35(4), 712–726.
  • Cathcart, A., Greer, D., and Neale, L. (2014). Learner-Focused Evaluation Cycles: Facilitating learning using feedforward, concurrent and feedback evaluation. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education. 39 (7), 790-802

Registration

For information, please contact:
Ms. Noranda Zhang , CETL
Phone: 3917 4729; Email: noranda@hku.hk​

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Organised by Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL)

Details of the workshop:

Date : 22, September, 2017 (Friday)
Time : 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Venue : Room 321, 3/F, Run Run Shaw Building (Main Campus), HKU
Facilitator : Dr. Cecilia Chan, Head of Professional Development, Associate Professor, HKU
CETL Presenters Sharing : Dr Courtney Fung, HKU Early Career Teaching Award Winner;
Dr Julie CHEN Yun, Outstanding Teaching Award Winner

Abstract

This workshop is open to all teaching staff who are interested in finding out more about the different Teaching Excellence Awards. Staff will be provided an overview of the award schemes, the key selection criteria and advice in preparing an evidence-based teaching portfolio. Two previous winners will be there to share their experience on their journeys of applying the TEA. Staff who are thinking about applying in the next round are strongly encouraged to attend. Staff who are not sure, or would simply like to know more about the scheme, are most welcome.

Registration

For information, please contact:
Ms. Noranda Zhang , CETL
Phone: 3917 4729; Email: noranda@hku.hk​

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Organised by Technology-Enriched Learning Initiative (TELI)

Date : September 9, 2017 (Saturday)
Time : 2:00pm
Venue : 1/F, Broadway Cinematheque, 3 Public Square St, Yau Ma Tei
Speakers :
- Gina Marchetti, Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature, HKU
- Aaron Magnan-Park, Assistant Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature, HKU
- Stacilee Ford, Honorary Associate Professor in the Department of History, HKU

Registration: http://bit.ly/hkcinema2

The talk will be conducted in English.

About the seminar:

Understanding the role Hong Kong plays on world screens animates the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) devoted to Hong Kong films. Together, let’s examine how the local and the global intersect to make Hong Kong cinema an integral part of popular culture around the world as well as a leading force in the development of world cinematic art.

This presentation introduces you to the key films, stars, directors, and genres that represent Hong Kong on global screens. We will chat about how flows of capital, people, technologies, ideas and creativity circulate and shape the cultural industry of filmmaking globally, resulting in transnational co-productions and cross-cultural co-operations.

Join us to learn more about Hong Kong cinema as an expressive art and a creative industry.

Films:

The Karate Kid (dir. Harald Zwart, 2010)
Fist of Fury / The Chinese Connection 精武門 (dir. Lo Wei 羅維, 1972)
Enter the Dragon 龍爭虎鬥 (dir. Robert Clouse, 1973)
An Autumn’s Tale 秋天的童話 (dir. Mabel Cheung 張婉婷, 1987)
The Killer 喋血雙雄(dir. John Woo 吳宇森, 1989)
Infernal Affairs 無間道 (dir. Andrew Lau and Alan Mak 劉偉強和麥兆輝, 2002)
In the Mood for Love 花樣年華 (dir. Wong Kar Wai 王家衛, 2000)

HKU free online course: Hong Kong Cinema through a Global Lens

Week 1 Teaser
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Week 2 Teaser
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Week 3 Teaser
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Week 4 Teaser
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Week 5 Teaser
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Trailer and sneak previews

Registration

About this course
“If history is our guide, we can assume that the battle between the intellect and will of the human species and the extraordinary adaptability of microbes will be never-ending.” (1)

Despite all the remarkable technological breakthroughs that we have made over the past few decades, the threat from infectious diseases has significantly accelerated. In this course, we will learn why this is the case by looking at the fundamental scientific principles underlying epidemics and the public health actions behind their prevention and control in the 21st century.

This course covers the following four topics:

  1. Origins of novel pathogens;
  2. Analysis of the spread of infectious diseases;
  3. Medical and public health countermeasures to prevent and control epidemics; and
  4. Panel discussions involving leading public health experts with deep frontline experiences to share their views on risk communication, crisis management, ethics and public trust in the context of infectious disease control.

In addition to the original introductory sessions on epidemics, we revamped the course by adding:

  1. new panel discussions with world-leading experts; and
  2. supplementary modules on next generation informatics for combating epidemics.

You will learn:

  1. the origins, spread and control of infectious disease epidemics;
  2. the importance of effective communication about epidemics; and
  3. key contemporary issues relating to epidemics from a global perspective.

Who is this class for
This is an introductory course suitable for all learners, with no prerequisite required.

Join the fight against epidemics now.

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook for more updates!

—-
(1) Fauci AS, Touchette NA, Folkers GK. Emerging Infectious Diseases: a 10-Year Perspective from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Emerg Infect Dis 2005 Apr; 11(4):519-25.

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It’s always good to recognize your own achievement after reaching a goal. Same for completing a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) – After working so hard for a course, the best way to reward yourself is to get a unique certificate. With a certificate, you can easily share your achievement with your employers and friends.

Q: How to get one?
A: As we offer courses on both edX and Coursera, the process of application differs for the two platforms. But in general, you will need to complete the following 3 steps to get the certificate:

  1. pass the course
  2. verify your ID on edX or Coursera
  3. make a payment to edX or Coursera

Q: How much is a certificate?
A: It depends on the course. Usually USD 50.

Q: Is it printed?
A: You will receive an e-certificate on the edX or Coursera platform. You will NOT receive a printed copy but you are welcome to print it. Check out these links for more details on where to find your Certificate on edX and Coursera.

You may also add your certificate to your LinkedIn profile (edX, Coursera).

Q: I followed all the steps but still can’t purchase / download it. What’s wrong?
A: Please contact us at enquiry@teli.hku.hk and let us know your name, the email you used to register at edX and/or Coursera, and the issue involved. You may also include a screenshot of the problem you encountered.

Q: Is the certificate issued by the University of Hong Kong?
A: It is jointly issued by the platform (edX or Coursera) and HKU. However, please note that the certificate does not count as credit towards a degree from our university.

Q: I can’t afford to pay for a certificate. What should I do?
A: You can file an application for financial aid from edX and Coursera.

Q: Can I still take the course without buying a certificate?
A: Yes of course! Most of our course content is free (except the Honours track in Materials in Oral Health). You are more than welcome to join our courses without buying a certificate. You can choose to upgrade to a verified certificate later if you change your mind. The verification upgrade deadline may be different for different courses. More details can be found here: edX, Coursera.

Still got a question? Contact us.
Happy learning!

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Educators, wherever we are, should keep up with the challenges and trends in higher education worldwide. One effective way to stay informed is to engage in dialogues with colleagues from around the world. On 20 June, 2017, we learnt about the top 10 challenges and trends in Australian universities in a seminar delivered by Dr Caroline Steel, Strategic Educational Consultant, APAC, Blackboard International ASCILITE Life Member Awardee and Past President Adjunct Academic, The University of Queensland.

The following is the list of key challenges and trends ranked by Australian academic leaders in a study led by Dr Steel:

10 Teaching and Learning Challenges 10 Teaching and Learning Trends
  1. Student career development and employability
  2. Student engagement and satisfaction
  3. Assessment and feedback
  4. Technology-enhanced pedagogical practice
  5. Student attrition
  6. Improving work-integrated learning
  7. First year experience and transition
  8. Personalized adaptive learning
  9. Academic adoption of educational technologies
  10. Academic misconduct
  1. Learning analytics;
    Unbundling qualification
    (both items ranked number one)
  2. Teaching quality standards;
    Fully online courses;
    Students as partners
  3. Mobile-enabled learning;
    Adaptive learning technology
  4. Digital examinations
  5. MOOC’s;
    Open Education Resources (OER’s)

Key Challenges in Teaching and Learning
Student career development and employability is considered to be the biggest challenge in the Australian higher education context. In the past, universities mainly focused on training students into critical thinkers. In today’s rapidly changing society, educators should take one step further to educate both the ‘thinker’ and the ‘worker’. Given the rapid development of automation, AI and cognitive computing, some jobs may no longer exist in 10 years’ time. Students may not be fixed to one career throughout their lives. To prepare students for this highly uncertain future, HE institutions should help them acquire various employability skills and develop cross/trans-disciplinary thinking.

The second challenge is student engagement and satisfaction, in both on-campus & online teaching. According to Professor Karen Nelson, an interviewee in the study, student engagement constitutes of three parameters: behavioural, cognitive and affective. The challenge for universities is to “create the educational conditions that will trigger emotion and motivation so that students are engaged.”

Major Trends in Higher Education
The two most prominent trends in Australian higher education are learning analytics and unbundling qualification.

Learning analytics is a potential game changer in higher education. ‘There is enormous potential in learning analytics,’ said Professor Martin Carroll in an interview for the study. However, even though analytics have been used by lots of industries in Australia, high education is falling behind. It is necessary for institutions to keep up with the trend and look for ways to use analytics to improve teaching and learning.

Unbundling qualifications is another prominent trend in Australian higher education. Universities are now looking into the possibility of unbundling qualifications and micro-credentialing as alternative ways to provide learning, so that learners can obtain the skills they need as quickly as possible. For example, instead of completing an entire MBA programme, some professionals may only want to learn certain components of the degree. If universities are able to repurpose some of the content, then more choices will be available to learners. After obtaining skills and credits from various programmes and fields, learners can demonstrate their expertise in their e-portfolios.

Technology
It is worth noting that, among the top 10 T&L trends, 6 are tech-related, namely

  • Fully online courses
  • Mobile-enabled learning
  • Adaptive learning technology
  • Digital examinations
  • MOOC’s
  • Open Education Resources (OER’s)

This finding is certainly encouraging as the use of technology enhances teaching and learning and better prepares institutions for the challenges in higher education. Technology allows flexibility in learning and makes personalized learning possible. Learning management systems and grading tools such as Turnitin make it easier for teachers to assess students and provide feedback. The blending of face-to-face lectures with e-learning tools, such as Mentimeter and Kahoot!, caters for students’ diversified learning needs, which potentially enhances student engagement.

What about Hong Kong?
We are embracing the same challenges in Hong Kong and are working along similar lines. Here at HKU, we strive to cultivate students’ employability skills (e.g. cognitive flexibility, negotiation) and develop cross-disciplinary thinking through events such as Inter-professional Team-based Learning (IPTBL) and Girls4Tech. To enhance student engagement, we are constantly designing new in-class activities, apps and games. To ensure the best learning experience for our students, our efforts in course development is paralleled by research efforts in learning analytics.

More and more teachers are joining the ride in developing MOOCs (on edX and Coursera) and SPOCs to enrich students’ blended learning experience. To further open up learning opportunities to a wider range of learners, we are also exploring the possibilities of unbundling qualifications and MicroMasters and getting ourselves ready for e-portfolios. More initiatives will be in place to shape the T&L landscape in Hong Kong in response to challenges and trends in higher education.

What do you think? How will you respond to these challenges and trends? Share your views with us.

Further reading

  1. “Learning and Teaching Challenges in Higher Education in Australia: A View from the Top”, an Australian academic leadership study conducted by ASCILITE and Blackboard International in 2016
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